Posts

Greenkeepers to the fore

Greenkeepers to the fore: Episode three of Syngenta Golf’s new docuseries Changing the Business of Golf is streaming now – and follows the greenkeeping team as they transform Stanedge Golf Club.

‘On Course for Change’ features Head Greenkeeper Christian ‘CJ’ Johnson as he oversees a major course upgrade while coping with new parenthood; Greenkeeper David Morgan renovates an overgrown par-three; and we meet new recruit James Wyatt, a pilot grounded by the pandemic, as he swaps runways for fairways.

Greenkeepers to the fore

Greenkeepers to the fore

Watch now: syngentagolf.com/changing-business-golf

“Nobody really notices the role of the greenkeeper,” says James, who is seeing golf from the greenkeeper’s perspective for the first time. “Everybody comes along, they play their golf, they expect the greens to be tidy, they expect the grass to be in good condition, but you don’t tend to see all of this as a player.”

But it’s not just customers who have high expectations. New course owner and PGA Professional Fame Tate believes course conditions are critically important to the customer experience – and the long-term success of her business.

“The golf course was my number one priority for change,” explains Fame. “If we were going to get people back, it was the golf course that was going to have to change.

“I want it to look absolutely immaculate. And as much as I wanted to wave my magic wand, make grass grow and make the greens perfect and do all these things instantly, I very quickly realised things take time.”

Join Fame, CJ, James and David as the turf team transform the Stanedge course to meet the demands of a growing membership.

And catch previous episodes following Fame’s remarkable one-woman mission to change golf, transform the customer experience and make her club a friendly and inclusive community venue.

Watch all episodes, streaming now, on Syngenta Golf: syngentagolf.com/changing-business-golf

For the latest industry news visit turfmatters.co.uk/news

Get all of the big headlines, pictures, opinions and videos on stories that matter to you.

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram for fun, fresh and engaging content.

You can also find us on Facebook for more of your must-see news, features, videos and pictures from Turf Matters.

BIGGA announce master greenkeepers

BIGGA announce master greenkeepers: The British & International Golf Greenkeepers Association is incredibly proud to reveal the identities of the latest members to achieve the Master Greenkeeper Certificate.

Joining some of the leading names within the turf management industry from across the globe are five outstanding BIGGA members who have achieved what is widely perceived to be the highest recognition in greenkeeping.

BIGGA announce master greenkeepers

BIGGA announce master greenkeepers

For the first time since 2019, BIGGA is delighted to reveal the names of those who will be added to the roster of Master Greenkeepers, which began in 1991. They are:

  1. Gregory Jones MG CGCS, 40, Golf Course Superintendent, Champions Run, Nebraska
  2. Anthony Williams MG CGCS, 57, Director of Golf Course Operations, TPC Four Seasons Las Colinas, Texas
  3. Matthew Aplin MG, 40, Course Manager, Goring & Streatley Golf Club, Berkshire
  4. Alan FitzGerald MG, 45, Golf Course Superintendent, LedgeRock Golf Club, Pennsylvania
  5. Greg Fitzmaurice MG, 42, Course Manager, Hunley Hotel & Golf Club, North Yorkshire

The Master Greenkeeper Certificate is awarded to those members of BIGGA who have reached the highest standards of greenkeeping and golf course management. Examination is rigorous and candidates must pass three stages to achieve the certificate, including an assessment of golf course operation and a case study and technical examination, on top of 10 years’ experience as a greenkeeper with at least three years spent in a course manager, head greenkeeper or superintendent position.

BIGGA CEO Jim Croxton said: “Congratulations to our latest batch of Master Greenkeepers, who join a prestigious list of some of the brightest and best names the industry has ever seen. Achieving the Master Greenkeeper Certificate is no mean feat and for a number of these candidates, the process has been long and has not been without setbacks. For those candidates, the courage and conviction to deal with the knock back and then return and achieve their goals is testament to the commitment and passion they’ve shown the profession throughout their careers and I’m delighted to welcome all five to the ranks of those we are proud to call Master Greenkeepers.”

Gregory Jones MG CGCS, golf course superintendent at Champions Run in Nebraska, said: “When I saw a phone call from the UK on my cell phone, I almost didn’t want to answer it. After failing the written exam before, I wasn’t prepared for another let down, but I gathered up the courage and answered it anyway. Receiving the news that I had passed was a feeling like none other! I was in the middle of spraying greens and I think I scared a couple of folks having coffee on their decks when I did a couple of fist pumps!”

Anthony Williams MG CGCS, director of golf course operations at TPC Four Seasons Las Colinas, said: “To become a Master Greenkeeper is the grandest of achievements for a greenkeeper. I thought, how can I say I have served my club at the highest level and not be a Master Greenkeeper? Being Master Greenkeeper number 82 is a dream come true and I will work hard to be worth it each and every day.”

Matthew Aplin MG, course manager at Goring & Streatley Golf Club, said: “It means the world to me to become a Master Greenkeeper. Once I attended the Master Greenkeeper workshop at BTME three years ago, I realised how much I wanted to challenge myself and my team, to see how far we could go. To pass the course assessment at Goring & Streatley was great and a reflection of what a great team I have the privilege to work with.”

Alan FitzGerald MG, golf course superintendent at LedgeRock Golf Club, said: “I cannot remember the last time that I was as excited as I was when I got word that I had become Master Greenkeeper number 84. The standards to become one are extremely high, which is shown by how few have gained the distinction over the last 30 years. Becoming a Master Greenkeeper is the accumulation of everything I have done over my career, which is why I am extremely excited and honoured to be a member of this select club.”

Greg Fitzmaurice MG, course manager at Hunley Hotel & Golf Club, said: “I have always looked at ways to improve, in order to be the best that I can be. Attaining the Master Greenkeeper Certificate has been another way of doing this and the process has been very challenging, motivating, rewarding and enjoyable. I have not only been able to improve my own attributes, but also improve the facilities at Hunley along the way.”

To find out more about the Master Greenkeeper Certificate and to get involved, head to the BIGGA website.

For the latest industry news visit turfmatters.co.uk/news

Get all of the big headlines, pictures, opinions and videos on stories that matter to you.

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram for fun, fresh and engaging content.

You can also find us on Facebook for more of your must-see news, features, videos and pictures from Turf Matters.

Groundsmen & greenkeepers numbers decline

Groundsmen & greenkeepers numbers decline: Groundsmen and greenkeepers, painters and decorators, plumbers, heating and ventilating engineers are just a few of the trades that the UK relies on, but a new report has revealed a decline in the number of workers in these trades. 

The trade trends report 2021 released by Skills Training Group has analysed 16 years worth of data from the Office for National Statistics to assess the state of the UK workforce.

Groundsmen & greenkeepers numbers decline

Groundsmen & greenkeepers numbers decline

In the report, it revealed multiple key trades on the decline, groundsmen and greenkeepers fell by 25.85 per cent between 2004 and 2020 from 32,500 to 24,100, while plumbers and heating and ventilating engineers fell by 4.19% (157,400 to 150,800) and painters and decorators by 17.80% (138,200 – 113,600).

Steel erectors took the largest hit of all trades analysed, between 2004 and 2020 workers in the trade fell by 47.93 per cent from 12,100 workers to 6,300.

Using the data, the team at Skills Training Group were able to forecast ahead to reveal what the future may look like for these trades if the average decline continues.

By 2049, the picture for groundsmen and greenkeepers looks completely different, projecting a decrease of more than 69%:

Skilled trades Oct 2004-Sep 2005 Oct 2049-Sep 2050 (est) Year-on-year average change Potential decrease over 46 years
Profession All persons in trade All persons in trade All persons in trade All persons in trade
Groundsmen and greenkeepers 32,500 9826.935089 -0.029 -69.76%

Commenting on the research and why young people may be the key to turning the tide for these industries, Mark McShane, managing director at Skills Training Group said:

“For many industries, young people entering the workforce early in their careers means they can learn the craft and make it a long term career – with many being business owners by the time they are 30. But, in order to encourage young people to make these choices, businesses in the industry need to engage with young people, sharing their success stories to encourage a new workforce.

“While many young people may enter into a skilled trade through college and apprenticeships, a missed opportunity may be those that have opted to continue studying for A-Levels. For these students, the general direction is to head off to university, so it’s no surprise that many may not have even considered a career in specific trades – this is where recruitment outside of the usual routes can prove fruitful.

“Communication and marketing needs to be a big part of each of the different industry’s goals – young people will better engage with clear and smart communication. To attract and recruit new talent to the industry, its image needs to adapt as well. Companies and industries that make noise, engage with social media and shout about what makes their trades great will see the tide change in the amount of people wanting a job.”

It’s not all bad for every trade, the data also shows that between 2004 and 2020 some trades thrived.

Roofers, roof tilers and slaters increased by 14.06 per cent, gardeners and landscape gardeners (23.9%) and farmers (28.64%).

Read the full report and insights from it here – https://www.skillstg.co.uk/blog/the-trade-trends-report-2021/

For the latest industry news visit turfmatters.co.uk/news

Get all of the big headlines, pictures, opinions and videos on stories that matter to you.

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram for fun, fresh and engaging content.

You can also find us on Facebook for more of your must-see news, features, videos and pictures from Turf Matters.

Golf greenkeepers ask for support

Golf greenkeepers ask for support: BIGGA has welcomed the Prime Minister’s announcement regarding the timetable for the reopening of golf.

As the members’ association for golf greenkeepers in the UK, BIGGA is acutely aware that golfers are eager to get back out on the course and start enjoying the limitless physical and mental health benefits of our wonderful sport.

Golf greenkeepers ask for support

Golf greenkeepers ask for support

However, as golfers have found in Scotland, where courses have remained open for limited play, this has been an incredibly wet and difficult winter and many greenkeepers have reported being able to do very limited maintenance throughout the colder months.

As such, while disappointed that the restart of golf will not be until 29 March in England, BIGGA welcomes the notice period as it will enable golf facilities to complete any essential winter maintenance and prepare the course for play to a standard that will not be detrimental to the long-term health of the facility.

Over the coming weeks BIGGA will be working alongside the governing bodies in golf to provide information regarding reasonable expectations of course presentation, so that returning golfers are aware of the challenges greenkeepers have faced with regards climate, staffing and COVID-19 restrictions and to ensure a safe, happy and prosperous return to golf for everyone.

For the latest industry news visit turfmatters.co.uk/news

Get all of the big headlines, pictures, opinions and videos on stories that matter to you.

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram for fun, fresh and engaging content.

You can also find us on Facebook for more of your must-see news, features, videos and pictures from Turf Matters.

Greenkeepers’ caution on golf’s return

Greenkeepers’ caution on golf’s return: Golfers were warned to expect “inevitable disappointment” when they were able to return to play whenever government lockdown restrictions are eased.

Only essential maintenance has been permitted, often by stripped down greenkeeping crews, since the decision was taken to shut the doors on clubs on March 23.

Greenkeepers' caution on golf's return

Greenkeepers’ caution on golf’s return

Images spread across social media over the past few weeks have shown courses looking striped and fantastic during the spring sunshine.

But the reality, when getting up close, will be areas – such as rough – that have not been as closely monitored as teams have stuck to guidance issued by governing bodies and worked with limited numbers.

Speaking during a Talking Shop webinar held by the British & International Golf Greenkeepers’ Association (BIGGA), a panel of course managers urged caution.

“It’s expectation. They (golfers) are going to come back and they’re going to think that everything is fantastic,” said Scott Reeves, Leyland course manager and BIGGA chairman, when asked what the biggest challenge was going to be on the resumption of golf.

“(The perception will be that) The course has been empty, so the greenkeepers must have all been beavering away making everything absolutely perfect in their absence.

“We’re going to have to manage that. We’ll have to manage the expectation prior to opening, or partial opening, communicate effectively and, once they are on site, explain and build relationships back up again with golfers.

“There’s going to be inevitable disappointment.”

Andy Ewence, course manager at Woking, explained he had stopped using twitter when the lockdown began to temper expectations.

“We can keep the surfaces looking OK, fairways, greens, tees, but it is the strimming, the rough, the weed spraying,” he said.

Ewence continued: “The problem is there’s what you’re doing and the golf course down the road could be doing something totally different and the members speak.

“It’s going to be hard one. One golf course might look absolutely outstanding that have had most of their staff there, and the other one doesn’t. Going from public, private, exclusive, they are all going to be different.”

Craig Haldane, golf courses manager at Gleneagles, said communication – and doing it at the right time – would be absolutely crucial in getting everyone on side.

He added the possibility of full crews not being able to return for some time even after reopening, because of various restrictions that would still be in place, meant greenkeepers would also have to moderate their own expectations.

For the latest industry news visit turfmatters.co.uk/news

Get all of the big headlines, pictures, opinions and videos on stories that matter to you.

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram for fun, fresh and engaging content.

You can also find us on Facebook for more of your must-see news, features, videos and pictures from Turf Matters.

New Zealand greenkeepers return

New Zealand greenkeepers return: Mowers started up for the first time in three weeks on Tuesday at many of New Zealand’s 400 golf courses.

Greenkeepers returned “just in time”, with some facing overgrown roughs and disease encroaching on the greens.

New Zealand greenkeepers return

New Zealand greenkeepers return

The Government gave the all-clear for golf course maintenance to resume, following lobbying from those in the golfing community. The stipulation from the Ministry of Primary Industries, which applies to bowling and croquet greens and nurseries, is that the maintenance must be urgent.

The upkeep of golf courses is a daily task, and if maintenance were delayed further, it could have a million-dollar impact, said Remuera golf club superintendent and NZ Golf Superintendents Association board member Spencer Cooper.

“We’ve got back to work just in time. It’s essential we maintain the properties so we’ve got something to go back to,” he said.

“Delaying… there would be tens of millions of dollars worth of damage.

“A lot of golf courses wouldn’t survive and it would result in a lot of people losing their jobs unncessarily.”

Cooper arrived on Tuesday to find “really nasty” fungal disease starting to appear on the greens. Some diseases can spread “extremely quickly” and wipe out entire greens within 48 to 72 hours.

“For the golf courses that do financially survive, the damage could be quite severe which would cost a lot of money to repair,” he said.

“It would keep the golf courses that do survive closed for longer and it would take longer for people to get back to playing golf.”

Golf is one of the most popular sports in the country, with more than half a million players picking up the golf clubs in the last 12 months.

Cooper’s club has a membership of 1600, and has more than 60,000 rounds of golf per year.

While Cooper is sceptical about the sport resuming in the next few weeks, he said golf offers an opportunity for exercise while in isolation.

“I believe people can go and play golf, in pretty much isolation, out in nature, get a bit of exercise, getting a bit of sunshine, without coming across too many other people,” he said.

“If we do it properly we believe we’re one of the few sports that can really be viable when others can’t…[and] there’s a huge mental health benefit.”

For now, he and his team are happy to be out on the course, also working on their mental health.

“This something extremely therapeutic about mowing grass and the smell of it… it was amazing,” he laughed.

Click here to read the original article

For the latest industry news visit turfmatters.co.uk/news

Get all of the big headlines, pictures, opinions and videos on stories that matter to you.

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram for fun, fresh and engaging content.

You can also find us on Facebook for more of your must-see news, features, videos and pictures from Turf Matters.

Greenkeepers work fury

Greenkeepers work fury: Greenkeepers at Caird Park Golf Club in Dundee are said to be fuming they are being forced to continue going in to work despite two of their colleagues testing positive for coronavirus, according to the region’s Evening Telegraph.

A report from BIGGA last week claimed that it was in their understanding that greenkeepers are able to keep “essential maintenance” of golf courses should they wish to, despite the UK lockdown for COVID-19 so that golfers would still have courses to play when the health crisis is over.

Greenkeepers work fury

Greenkeepers work fury

Union bosses are said to be backing the call for greenkeepers at the club to be off work due to two members of staff testing positive for COVID-19, with one other self-isolating due to having symptoms.

A decision to remove staff workers from the course is now being strongly backed by union bosses representing the club.

“Following the confirmation of the cases the remaining staff feel they shouldn’t be asked to go into work,” said Dundee branch secretary of the GMB, Jim Cunningham.

“The union is backing this call and we are demanding that our members should not have to go to work in the meantime. We have asked that the remaining workforce is currently removed from such  hazardous duties.”

He added: “We have been told that golf courses must be maintained so that when the current crisis is over they can immediately come back into use.

“However, we don’t believe that the greenkeepers and groundsman are essential staff currently. City council gardeners are not working at the moment and we don’t think our members should have to either.”

It is also claimed in the report that members of staff were not being supplied with the correct level of protective equipment with which to go about doing thejr jobs on the course.

Click here to read the original article

For the latest industry news visit turfmatters.co.uk/news

Get all of the big headlines, pictures, opinions and videos on stories that matter to you.

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram for fun, fresh and engaging content.

You can also find us on Facebook for more of your must-see news, features, videos and pictures from Turf Matters.

Greenkeepers still able to work

Greenkeepers still able to work: Following the Prime Minister’s curbs to fight coronavirus, greenkeepers can still attend work for ‘security and essential maintenance purposes’

But all work “must be carried out in accordance with government guidelines on social distancing”, and the association that represents the profession is seeking further guidance on what that means.

Greenkeepers still able to work

Greenkeepers still able to work

The Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, on Monday evening imposed strict new curbs on movement in a bid to stop the spread of the virus.

The restrictions insisted people must stay at home except for medical needs, daily exercise, shopping for basic necessities and travel to and from essential work. He added that police would be given the powers to enforce those rules.

That announcement led to England Golf instructing all clubs, courses and facilities to close, while Scottish Golf asked all golfers to “refrain from playing” until further notice.

The body which represents greenkeepers, the British and International Golf Greenkeepers Association (BIGGA), subsequently sought government clarification on whether it was appropriate for “limited and cautious maintenance of golf courses to take place”.

England Golf issued a brief statement, which said: “In order to provide clarification for golf clubs following on from the Prime Minister’s statement of 23 March, we are able to inform you of the following: For security and essential maintenance purposes, greenkeeping staff can still attend work.”

And in an email to members, BIGGA chief executive Jim Croxton said the association was now seeking “further clarification urgently” on what essential maintenance would entail.

He wrote: “Following the Prime Minister’s announcement on Monday evening that the country is effectively in ‘lockdown’, we have been working hard to obtain clarification as to what that means in practice for our members, many of whom are looking for reassurances with regards their careers and income.

“It is an unprecedented time for us all and firstly I want to reaffirm the message that our members’ health and that of their families come first.

“Today we have received the following information from the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS): ‘For security and essential maintenance reasons greens staff can still attend work.’

“This is, I believe, only partial clarification. It permits greenkeepers to work on essential maintenance but does not clarify what that means. We are naturally seeking further clarification urgently.

“At this moment BIGGA is working tirelessly for our members; we’re working closely with our golf industry partners to get further clarification from government and also to support all those people in the golf industry that are affected by the crisis.”

Click here to read the original article

For the latest industry news visit turfmatters.co.uk/news

Get all of the big headlines, pictures, opinions and videos on stories that matter to you.

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram for fun, fresh and engaging content.

You can also find us on Facebook for more of your must-see news, features, videos and pictures from Turf Matters.

Coronavirus tips for greenkeepers

Coronavirus tips for greenkeepers: BIGGA – the British and International Golf Greenkeepers Association – explain how clubs can assist their vital greenkeeping teams during the pandemic.

Greenkeepers are an essential part of keeping a golf club open. The clubhouse may be able to temporarily shut its doors and ask golfers to change at home or in their cars, but if the course isn’t maintained then a club is losing its key asset.

Coronavirus tips for greenkeepers

Coronavirus tips for greenkeepers

In providing advice to greenkeepers, BIGGA is doing what it can to keep golf courses open, primarily for the economic health of the sport, but also because the government is concerned about ‘isolation fatigue’. As it is able to played without direct human contact, golf is a low-risk opportunity to stay active if you’re able to leave the house.

However, if a golf club’s entire greenkeeping team is forced to self-isolate or is unable to work due to illness, then the health of the golf course will be at risk, not just in the immediate future but also long-term as it will take some time to recover and the damage could be substantial.

Spring’s warmer weather means the turf will start growing at an increased rate. If courses can’t be maintained for an extended period then the finer areas – greens in particular – will suffer. Disease occurrence is more likely and once the grass is longer, it can’t just be chopped down to its previous height.

The following is guidance to help keep your greenkeeping team healthy during the current health crisis:

1. Split your team up into separate groups and keep them isolated from each other. Make sure you have groups who are able to complete specialist tasks as a unit, although this may also be an opportunity for trainee members of the team to learn new skills. If you need to speak to members of a different group, call them over the radio or phone, rather than meeting in person. As course manager, you also need to stay separate from the teams otherwise you risk spreading the virus among your team.

2. Allow different groups of staff to start and finish at half hour interviews and stagger their coffee breaks and lunch times. Make sure food and drink is stored in separate compartments and ensure each group completely cleans the breakroom after they have used it.

3. It may be an idea to ask the team to lunch in their cars rather than the mess room. Greenkeepers spend a lot of time working alone and so when they come together for a lunch or coffee break, it is a prime opportunity for the virus to spread. At this time, as much isolation as possible is hugely important.

4. As in all aspects of life at this time, hygiene is essential. For greenkeepers, that doesn’t just mean washing your hands for more than 20 seconds, but also ensuring that any equipment you use is completely and efficiently cleaned after use. Likewise, areas such as communal areas, washrooms and offices should be comprehensively cleaned on a regular basis. The current outbreak is an opportunity for a bit of spring cleaning.

5. There are tools that greenkeepers can use to help protect the course if they are unable to gain access for a period of time. The use of dew dispersant will suppress the formation of dew and reduce turf problems made worse by excess moisture. It will also decrease drying times following rainfall.

6. Growth regulators can be used to slow down the growth of the turf, reducing the need to mow it as frequently. Growth regulators work by causing a temporary halt in the production plant hormones responsible for promoting growth in grasses.

7. A programme of Integrated Pest Management will take a proactive approach to disease control and preventative fungicides can help reduce the instances of disease on the turf.

8. Most importantly, if you’re ill or showing any of the symptoms of coronavirus, stay at home. The golf club will survive without you for a few days, but if you make the entire team ill and indirectly cause the closure of the course, then the consequences could be dire. At times like this, it’s better to be cautious.

9. Being prepared for the worst by developing contingency plans are important and you can find more information about these, such as buddying up with other clubs and training other staff members or volunteers, by checking out the guidance BIGGA and golf’s other membership organisations recently published.

10. Other advice to prevent the spread of coronavirus at golf clubs includes:

  • Leave the flag in the hole at all times
  • Remove rakes and any other pieces of course furniture that golfers may touch – let the greenkeepers rake the bunkers and golfers can wipe their own golf balls on a towel
  • Only pick your own ball up
  • Do not share any equipment, such as golf clubs or rangefinders
  • Try to keep a distance of two metres from your playing partners
  • Don’t shake hands after your game
  • Adjust your catering provision to reduce physical contact – keep a barrier between you, use disposable plates and cups, have hand washing facilities available on every table
  • Prioritise online services for entries, bookings and scoring.
  • Take payments using contactless means.

For more information, visit the BIGGA website, or reach out on Twitter

Click here to read the original article

For the latest industry news visit turfmatters.co.uk/news

Get all of the big headlines, pictures, opinions and videos on stories that matter to you.

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram for fun, fresh and engaging content.

You can also find us on Facebook for more of your must-see news, features, videos and pictures from Turf Matters.

Greenkeeper’s 30 years of service

Greenkeeper’s 30 years of service: Market Drayton Golf Club’s head greenkeeper has achieved a remarkable 30 years of service with the club.

Simon Cotterill, who joined the club staff as the 11-hole course was expanding to 18 holes, has greatly influenced its development.

Greenkeeper's 30 years of service

Greenkeeper’s 30 years of service

Market Drayton Golf Course is now recognised as one of the best in the area and can boast a challenging, well-maintained, scenic course that is rarely closed.

During the ongoing development of the course, the club has been mindful of its beautiful natural surroundings, with Cotterill always been a great advocate in this area. He also undertakes extracurricular work on behalf of the club through his role in maintaining the playing areas of a number of local sports facilities.

The club said: “The extraordinary contribution of Cotterill over the years and the superb quality of the course and greens, is testimony to his long-term commitment.

“Simon is a keen angler and the club demonstrated their gratitude for such loyalty by presenting him a significant gift to enhance his enjoyment of his favourite pastime.”

Click here to read the original article

For the latest industry news visit turfmatters.co.uk/news

Get all of the big headlines, pictures, opinions and videos on stories that matter to you.

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram for fun, fresh and engaging content.

You can also find us on Facebook for more of your must-see news, features, videos and pictures from Turf Matters.