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A Masterline mix for all surfaces

A Masterline mix for all surfaces: In the 12 years since he established Greensward Sports Consultancy, it’s been seed from DLF that Director Andy Boyce has turned to for reliable results on surfaces from across the sporting spectrum.

Whether it’s bowls, cricket or winter sports, Andy swears by mixtures from both Masterline and Johnsons Sports Seed for germination, presentation and plant health that never fails to hit the mark.

A Masterline mix for all surfaces

A Masterline mix for all surfaces

Offering everything from regular maintenance contracts through to one-off renovations, Greensward delivers the full complement of services to a wide variety of sports facilities across the South West. “For me, the Masterline range from DLF offers not just versatility, but quality that has been consistent over the years” explains Andy, who heads up a team of seven. “This means that no matter the type of venue we’re working at, there’s a mixture or a combination of cultivars that’ll work.”

Andy’s go-to mixtures have been PM36 (Wicket) for cricket, croquet and grass tennis courts, and Masterline’s PM79 (Playing Field) for winter sports surfaces and cricket outfields. PM79 incorporates 50% Double 4Turf® tetraploid rye for stronger establishment, drought tolerance and exceptional disease resistance and overall performance during the winter months. “A lot of the football pitches we’re working on are at grassroots level, some of which can be hosting three or four matches a week. This is where you’re relying on mixtures with high wear tolerance and seed that can germinate at colder temperatures. DLF’s tetraploid perennial ryegrasses have been a massive step forward in helping us to deliver that.”

“The Masterline range tends to be at just the right price-point for a lot of our clients, but it’s great to also have the Johnson’s mixtures at our disposal if we think something from this range will be better suited, or sometimes to fulfil a customer request.” Andy will consult with his DLF Regional Technical Manager Ian Barnett, whose advice he has trusted for many years. “Ian is always on hand with the knowledge we need and can answer any questions we may have on the various cultivars, mixtures and ranges. The fantastic service compliments the seed – it’s the whole package.”

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Johnsons Perennial Rye mix hailed ‘amazing’

Johnsons Perennial Rye mix hailed ‘amazing’: As the only club in Essex to make it onto the England Top 100 list, Thorndon Park in Ingrave has a reputation to uphold for its putt-perfect greens and feature fairways.

A combination of two years of drought, combined with some extensive leatherjacket damage, had done its very best to scupper that, but a switch in seeding strategy – from fescue to perennial ryegrass from Johnsons Sports Seed – has seen a recovery of the fairways that Course Manager David Byron can only describe as amazing!

Johnsons Perennial Rye mix hailed ‘amazing’

Johnsons Perennial Rye mix hailed ‘amazing’

When David took over as Course Manager in September 2020, tackling the loss of coverage on the fairways was his first major task. “It’s no exaggeration to say that what we were faced with was really just mud and dust” explains David, who heads up a greens team of nine. “Craig Spooner from DLF came in and conducted a course walk and we decided upon a switch to a bespoke Perennial Ryegrass mixture – featuring Dickens, Chardin, Clementine and Monroe – to give us quick, strong growth and recovery while we rebuild the soil profile – with the aim of later down the line, re-introducing fescue species.”

Ideally suited for the renovation of high traffic areas, perennial ryegrass delivers improved drought tolerance, high disease resistance and excellent year-round colour, and importantly for David, fast recovery. “We first sowed the Rye fairway mix in September so we’re less than a year into the programme and we have recovered all our fairways – in fact, coverage across the whole course is currently fantastic.”

“We’ve been using Johnsons’ J Tee on our tees for the last few years and that always performs well, and on the greens it’s J All Bent which was last sown at the end of May and this has given us a great initial strike.” While David is delighted with results course-wide, the club’s determination to rise even higher in the ranks means mixtures are always being reviewed and assessed with the STRI ratings. “We can be assured with table-topping cultivars that with Johnsons, we’re going to be getting the tolerances and resistances we need to always be improving.”

David concludes, “The Johnsons mixtures are also backed up with fantastic technical support, both from Craig and Richard Lewis at our distributor Indigrow. The support network and after-care advice we get is worth more to me than saving a few quid here and there on product. Buying into Johnsons you get the complete package.”

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Mix Business With Pleasure At SALTEX

Mix Business With Pleasure At SALTEX: If you’re heading to Saltex 2019, you’re probably planning to talk turf, ogle new kit and perhaps grab a drink or two along the way.

Scott Brooks (Head of Grounds and Estate, St. George’s Park) and Karl McDermott (Head Groundsman, Lord’s) will be taking part in a live Q&A with complimentary drinks for all attendees.

Mix Business With Pleasure At SALTEX

This social event will take place on stand F185, 4pm on 30th October, hosted by White Horse Contractors, giving you the chance to pick the brains of the men responsible for two of the UK’s most iconic grounds.

Win a magnum of champagne! The top three questions submitted in advance (as judged by Scott and Karl) will each win a magnum of champagne. For your chance to win, email whc@whitehorsecontractors.co.uk or tweet @whitehorsecontr.

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Beware Of The Mix Up

Beware Of The Mix Up: Do you know what you are mixing up in your sprayer and what it is going to do?

By Chris Humphrey MBPR FQA – Technical Manager, Collier Turf Care

I don’t know how many times I have heard someone say “I was told I could mix these things in the spray tank”

Beware Of The Mix Up

Before you mix anything in the spray tank you must first ask yourself what am I trying to achieve? Some things just do not mix chemically, some things will mix but one may well deactivate another; sometimes what mixes well may have an inappropriate water volume.

When applying a fungicide, do you put a bit of iron in the mix? It gives you colour and dries out any mycelium but most iron products will not tank mix with such active ingredients as they react badly due to the acidic ph. In addition most iron products contain sulphates which can react.

This reaction produces insoluble precipitate sediment which forms a sediment in the spray tank. This can block the sprayer, nozzles, pumps and pipework, and render the products ineffective. This can also result in uneven spray applications.

Tank mixing can be a great timesaver but only if your active ingredients are going to do what you want them to. For example, do not mix a foliar feed with a wetting agent. Although they may mix quite nicely in the spray tank, the wetting agent is designed to get into the soil and it will take the foliar feed with it. This is not ideal as you want the foliar feed on the leaf and you will get no response from it if you take it into the soil.

You may be told that by adding something to the spray tank it will improve the performance for your chemical. That is an Adjuvant. An adjuvant is officially defined as materials other than water that increase the effectiveness of an active ingredient but have no biological activity in themselves. For a product to be classed as an adjuvant it must be tested, registered and have an adjuvant number.

For all advice on tank mixing, you must ensure you consult a BASIS qualified advisor. You don’t want to end up with a tank full of jelly where chemicals react or render your expensive fungicide useless by adding an inappropriate product.

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