Ilkley Town back up and running

Ilkley Town back up and running: Ilkley Town AFC is back up and running in the wake of flooding by Storm Ciara.

“We’re very pleased to be back up and running again,” said Richard Giles, chairman of Ilkley Town. “When Storm Ciara hit, the river burst its banks and came on to the pitch.”

Ilkley Town back up and running

Ilkley Town back up and running

Since then, 20 teams of players and coaches across the whole of the football club have been unable to train or play games for the last two-and-a-half weeks.

Ilkley’s first team, who play on the all-weather pitch at Ben Rhydding Sports Club, have relied on the help of at least 50 volunteers to bring the playing facilities back into use again.

“We’ve brushed and disinfected the pitch,” said Giles. “We’ve worked hard on it, and have had a lot of volunteers to come and help. We’ve had a great response from the community, and players, parents and coaches have all volunteered their time.”

When asked if the floods had disrupted the improvements Ilkley Town need to carry out to upgrade their facilities in case of possible promotion, Giles said: “It’s distracted us, but even during the flooding from Storm Ciara the decorator was inside the pavilion refurbishing the changing room while the flooding was happening. It’s built up higher than the pitch, so it looked like it was in the middle of a lake.”

The hard work by the volunteers has meant for the first time since Storm Ciara, Ilkley’s first team will be able to train in preparation for this Saturday’s West Yorkshire League Cup match against Carlton Athletic. Kick-off is 2pm at Ben Rhydding Sports Club.

With their last two games called off because of the weather, Giles said: “The players will be a bit rusty as they get back to match sharpness. However, every other team will be the same boat.”

Giles said Ilkley Town are just one of the teams who use the facilities at Ben Rhydding Sports Club affected by the flooding.

“The Ben Rhydding hockey pitch had been under water and the groundsman at Ben Rhydding Cricket Club has been working hard to get the pitch back into shape.”

He added that two grass 11-a-side pitches and three mini pitches used by Ilkley Town’s junior teams seem to be okay despite the flooding.

“They’re not too bad,” said Giles. “Once the river goes down, they drain well.”

Giles said the flooding caused by Storm Ciara is rare, and he said the only time he had seen anything like it was Boxing Day 2015. He also said the end of March last year was pretty bad as well.

“It has flooded four out of the last five years after not having flooded before that,” said Giles. “We’re just crossing our fingers that the worse is behind us.”

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The Grass is Greener in LaLiga

The Grass is Greener in LaLiga: From the rain of the north to the heat of the south, club greenkeepers in Spain are keeping their pitches in the same high conditions. Using LaLiga’s ‘Greenkeeper’ app, clubs are not only using the best techniques but sharing their data with other clubs.

In Spain, weather conditions can vary dramatically on a single match day, from torrential rain in northern territories to blazing heat in the south, to the tropical extremes of the Balearic or Canary Islands. These factors are beyond control but across LaLiga, the club’s greenkeepers have ensured that a football match will never be affected by adverse conditions.

The Grass is Greener in LaLiga

The Grass is Greener in LaLiga

Using a variety of maintenance techniques, while collaborating with the league’s very own greenkeeper, clubs have created world-class playing surfaces that can withstand all weathers and maintain a consistent visual style. This has become an essential part of Spanish football, both for protecting players from injury and for creating the best possible broadcast product.

LaLiga’s Regulation for Television Broadcasting ensures that every LaLiga match follows the same visual style. It covers camera positioning and graphics used by operators, but a unique element is the state of the grass. Among other requirements, clubs must ensure that the ball rolls perfectly, that the height of the grass cut is between 20 and 30 millimetres across its surface and that the pitch maintains the same shade of green.
Given Spain’s geography, the work required to meet these standards varies greatly. But no matter the club, the results are of the same quality.

“The need to maintain the pitch has changed a lot; in our case we have had to find more protective systems for the summer sun,” noted Vicente Alpuente, director of facilities and maintenance at Villarreal CF. “We are using new varieties of grass and have created new maintenance systems to make this possible.”
A similar level of effort can be seen up and down the country.

The north: Artificial light and unique pitch drainage
The temperate climate of Bilbao and the design of the San Mamés stadium make greenkeeping a distinct challenge for Athletic Club. “As sunlight is reduced in our stadium, it must be created artificially,” says Ángel Muñoyerro, head of the club’s pitch. As half of the playing field does not receive natural light, the club has installed solar lights that help the growth and maintenance of the lawn.

A further particularity of the San Mamés pitch is that it is made from hybrid grass, a popular plant for semi-closed stadiums that provides greater stability underfoot to reduce injuries to players. “A hybrid surface is essential for maintaining the same quality across the pitch and dealing with changing conditions,” added Muñoyerro.
The winters are particularly cold in northern Spain, nowhere more so than Pamplona. Therefore, thermal blankets are needed to help stimulate the grass in Osasuna’s El Sadar stadium. The renovations that are being carried out on the stadium have also restricted the entry of natural light in certain parts of the playing field, leading to the club installing artificial lights.

Another significant challenge in this region is rain, which can be consistent for many months of the year. To combat this, clubs have designed an intricate drainage system to ensure the pitch maintains acceptable levels. In the layer just below the pitch, there are around 30 centimetres of porous sand, allowing water to pass through. Beneath that is around 15 centimetres of gravel, through which the water passes and is funnelled into tubes that push the water away from the pitch.

“The current systems is nothing like it used to be,” said Osasuna’s grounds manager Juan Carlos Sanz. “Before, you’d finish working on one side of the pitch and the previous side you’d worked on would be a quagmire. Now, football can be quicker and more technical because the pitches don’t interfere with the play.”
Central Spain: Adding nutrients for harsh winters

As the highest capital city in Europe, Madrid has its own set of climate challenges including low winter temperatures, which are felt by the seven LaLiga clubs playing in the area.

Eduard Rovira, greenkeeper at Getafe CF’s Coliseum Alfonso Pérez, comments: “In winter it is difficult to maintain the pitch, because the soil temperature drops below 6 degrees. With the altitude of Madrid, the grass becomes dormant, meaning it doesn´t easily regain nutrients after being used.” It is there necessary to change plants before the cold arrives, growing a more durable grass that can survive the frost that settles over Madrid.

Just 5 kilometres from Getafe is the Butarque stadium of CD Leganés. Here, the control over the grass is exhaustive with the club taking daily measurements of soil moisture. The application of natural products, including algae, is also used to increase the natural d efences of the grass.
To maintain the colour, the club has had to find creative solutions, which include the application of nitrogen or iron. “In winter, maintaining a good colour is particularly difficult because the plant stops growing,” said Víctor Marín, communications manager at the club. “In this period add thermal blankets along with these nutrients as it reinforces the cells of the plant.”

The south: Summer heat demands fertigation and mowing
In Sevilla FC’s Ramón Sánchez-Pizjuán stadium, a more common problem is high temperatures. Carlos Benegas, greenkeeper at the club, noted: “Our work involves decreasing the density of grass to avoid the growth of fungi and increase oxygen flow. This improves the absorption of water and nutrients that the plant needs to survive here.”
An important phase begins in March, when temperatures increase and the grass begins to grow quickly. “We end up mowing the pitch more than once a week,” Benegas noted. Using a vertical cutting blade, the pitch is kept flat, enabling better grip for the players and ensuring a smoother roll of the ball.

At Granada CF, the introduction of the LaLiga’s guidelines has transformed the level of care applied at the Nuevo Los Cármenes stadium. “Maintenance has changed hugely in terms of investment, protection systems and tools used,” noted Javier Rodríguez, director of operations and infrastructure at the Andalusian club.

The club has employed a method of fertigation, recommended by LaLiga, which involves the injection of nutrients to help efficient and regular growth. “Because of the climate here, we use a hybrid of ryegrass and bluegrass which can deal with extreme temperatures,” said Javier Rodrígez, director of operations and infrastructure at the Andalusian club. “In the hottest months, we minimise impact by good mowing and watering, but we keep this at regular intervals so as not to not stress the grass too much.”

The islands: Varying nutrients to manage desert winds
Over 1,300km from the Spanish mainland, the conditions on the Canary Islands are entirely different from the rest of the country but the same requirements are still being met.

“In summer, we apply a product to the pitch that allows us to lower the temperature of the grass on the ground,” said Santiago Sosa, greenkeeper at LaLiga SmartBank side Las Palmas. “But when the months of September and October arrive, due to the influence we have of the Sahara, there is a dust that settles here.”

“We have to manage the impact of this to maintain grass quality, which involves a lot of mechanical labour” he continued. “We use a range of products and vary the percentages of nutrients we apply, depending on the temperature, to maintain the intensity of colour.”

Greenkeeper, the LaLiga app that helps improve lawn quality
Through the varied and difficult task of maintaining their pitches, LaLiga clubs have one advantage in common. Through the Greenkeeper application, developed by the league, staff can track and input all relevant information about the pitch, from local weather conditions to irrigation programmes being used.
Through generating digital reports and sharing them before a match, clubs can prepare adequately for any stadium visit.

“Greenkeeper helps me see what conditions the team will play when we travel around the country,” said Sosa. “There is also a database showing the conditions that other teams are playing in. We know about the hardness of the pitch, the height of the grass, or if there has been a recent planting. All of this means we are ready to play the best match possible.”

Overseeing all of this is Pedro Fernández-Bolaños, grounds quality manager at LaLiga, who has the unique job of managing 42 pitches at once. Working alongside all LaLiga clubs, Fernández-Bolaños is the point of contact that can advise on new techniques for maintaining the pitch or capturing relevant data, improving conditions for the league.
“With the reforms we have introduced, three key objectives have been met,” he says. “The first is to improve the safety of the players. In the last five years, the number of non-contact injuries has gone down significantly. Secondly, the quality of play has improved as the ball moves much better, even if it’s raining. Thirdly, the stadiums look better aesthetically, which is all important for our match broadcasts around the world.”

For Rodríguez, this collaboration with LaLiga puts Spanish clubs at an advantage. “The techniques we are using are industry-leading and the ability to share this data means we can always make the best decisions,” he added. “It’s a unique feature of LaLiga.”

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Greenkeeper’s 30 years of service

Greenkeeper’s 30 years of service: Market Drayton Golf Club’s head greenkeeper has achieved a remarkable 30 years of service with the club.

Simon Cotterill, who joined the club staff as the 11-hole course was expanding to 18 holes, has greatly influenced its development.

Greenkeeper's 30 years of service

Greenkeeper’s 30 years of service

Market Drayton Golf Course is now recognised as one of the best in the area and can boast a challenging, well-maintained, scenic course that is rarely closed.

During the ongoing development of the course, the club has been mindful of its beautiful natural surroundings, with Cotterill always been a great advocate in this area. He also undertakes extracurricular work on behalf of the club through his role in maintaining the playing areas of a number of local sports facilities.

The club said: “The extraordinary contribution of Cotterill over the years and the superb quality of the course and greens, is testimony to his long-term commitment.

“Simon is a keen angler and the club demonstrated their gratitude for such loyalty by presenting him a significant gift to enhance his enjoyment of his favourite pastime.”

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Relief fund for Ciara victims

Relief fund for Ciara victims: Storm damaged pitches and facilities could be back in use sooner than expected thanks to a new emergency flood relief fund from Sport England.

The effects of Storm Ciara are still being fully assessed but, in an attempt to rectify the damage as soon as possible, local authorities and community sports organisations are being invited to apply for a grant of up to £5,000 to pay for emergency repairs.

Relief fund for Ciara victims

Relief fund for Ciara victims

Gale force winds and torrential rain have left pitches, pavilions and floodlights in a state of disrepair, with Cumbria, Lancashire and Yorkshire among the worst-hit areas.

The grants, which will come from the Community Asset Fund, can be provided in as little as three weeks. But chief executive, Tim Hollingsworth, has highlighted where attentions should be focused.

“When flooding happens, the priority must be making sure people are safe, they can get back into their homes and vital public services are back up and running,” he said.

“But we know from the floods in 2013 and 2015 that flood water can cause significant damage to sports pitches and pavilions, changing and social facilities.

“We’re making emergency funding available now so when the time is right sports organisations can pay for rebuilds and repairs quickly.

“We want to ensure that the sports facilities in local communities that help keep people physically active are not forgotten in the floods so they are ready to use as soon as people want them.”

The grants could typically be used to restore grass pitches, to repair and decontaminate flood or wind-damaged clubhouses, replace damaged electrical systems or dredge blocked drains.

The Community Asset Fund was designed to help communities quickly respond to emergencies or unexpected events that stop people from being active.

From damaged sports club roofs to areas hit by flood damage, our team aims to provide quick responses to those most badly affected.

Yorkshire Sport Foundation chief executive officer Nigel Harrison said his organisation is working with local authorities, national governing bodies and partner organisations in the west and south of the county to assess the full extent of the damage.

“The impact is far reaching and covers large parts of the area,” he said. “We welcome Sport England’s early intervention, and we look forward to working with them to help get the affected clubs and facilities up and running again as soon as possible.”

Organisations that need assistance with their application should contact the Funding line.

While guidance on dealing with both the aftermath of flooding and mitigating damage can be found on the sustainability page.

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Cricket club counting cost of Ciara

Cricket club counting cost of Ciara: Bridgeholme Cricket Club is counting the cost of being flooded again, but this time it is worse than ever, according to groundsman Keith Hudson.

The club’s Eastwood ground has been flooded several times in recent years, but it has been left in a horrendous state by Storm Ciara over the weekend.

Cricket club counting cost of Ciara

Cricket club counting cost of Ciara

Keith said: “It’s the biggest flood in the club’s history.

“The walls have gone, there’s sand, silt and sludge everywhere, rubbish all over the field, bricks and boulders.

“It’s seriously bad. The hardest thing is what do we do now? How do we put this back together again?

“We’re reputed as one of the most beautiful cricket grounds in Yorkshire, we’ve won awards for how beautiful it is. There’s not many cricket clubs that win a Yorkshire in Bloom award.

“It was bad in 2015, but we put in place all these things to prevent it, like a river wall.

“But this has just flattened it. The wall’s still intact but it’s completely flattened it.

“It’s unbelievable. I live right next to the ground so I could see it happening thinking ‘that’s going to go’ and ‘that’s going to go’.

“I’ve been groundsman for 35 years, and I’ve lived here since 1963, and I’ve never seen anything like it.

“The back of our street was awash with mud and the retaining wall at the bottom of the street was completely flattened.

“Pictures don’t do it justice.

Keith says the club, on Halifax Road in Todmorden, is used by all sorts of people in the community for dog walking, playing sports and children riding bicycles.

“Last time (in 2015) I was there every day for two months. There’s no easy way out of it,” Keith added.

“God knows how much it’s going to cost. Last time it cost £20,000 but you could maybe multiply that by five this time.

“We’ve been told we’ll get some funding from Sport England, the ECB and the YCB but I don’t think there’s enough money out there.

“It’s a mess.”

If you would like to donate to the club’s fundraising appeal, visit https://www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/sharon-mitchell-5?utm_term=4y3jv6XGV.

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S&B groundsman passes away

S&B groundsman passes away: The name Peter Dury will probably mean little to the current generation of Southport & Birkdale’s players or supporters.

Yet between 1961 and 1965 Dury, who died last month, built a reputation as the finest groundsman in the club’s history.

S&B groundsman passes away

S&B groundsman passes away

Moreover in a working life spanning half a century Dury carved out an impressive career in the sports and landscape industry as an inventor, pioneer of performance standards and a high-quality manager of playing facilities.

In 1961 S&B were still reeling from the sudden death of their groundsman Bert Ball
the previous June. The committee took the bold step to appoint 26-year-old Dury, who had previously been employed by the Derby Parks Department.

As a youngster Peter had been on Nottinghamshire’s ground staff and had even appeared in some second XI matches. He was also a qualified coach but it was as a groundsman that he made an immediate impact at Trafalgar Road.

County cricketers spoke of the excellence of Dury’s wickets and S&B’s historian, the late Ken Porter, wrote of him: “His keen love of the game, motivated by his sense of industry, ensured that the wicket and outfield reached a standard never previously attained. He never spared himself in ensuring that only the best was good enough”.

Dury also played some cricket on the pitches he had prepared.

He was a useful spin bowler and gifted batsman, although his groundsman’s duties largely restricted his appearances to Sunday games.

Nevertheless he scored a century against Crawfords in June 1964 before going out during the tea interval to prepare the wicket for the second innings of the match.

In 1964 Dury was one of only eight men in the country to be awarded the National Diploma of the National Association of Groundsmen.

This was the first of a myriad of awards which he was to earn in the years that followed.

He left S&B in 1965 to take up a more lucrative appointment as site supervisor for the Parks Department of Nuneaton Council and from there his career really took off.

Dury was recognised as a specialist in synthetic turf pitch and playground surfaces, and equally as a leading expert in natural turf pitch construction across the world. His talents were recognised in 2002 when he received an Honorary Doctorate Degree from the University of Essex.

In addition he received a life-time achievement award from the Institute of Groundsmanship the following year, when he also received the National Playing Fields Association President’s award.

He received the ECB Award for services to cricket in 2010 and two years later Peter was presented with an MBE for services to groundsmanship.

In 2018 Peter became the only person ever to receive a second lifetime’s achievement award from the Institute of Groundsmanship.

John McPartlin, who first met Peter when just 12 years old, recalls: “He was a lovely man and patiently put up with a few of us haunting the ground every day in the school holidays, following him around and asking him questions.

“At 11am we would all go and have a cup of tea with Peter and sitting around the old battered table he shared his sandwiches and cricketing knowledge, and without realising it, we would all be drawn into the hinterland of knowledge and tradition which makes cricket such a wonderful game.”

Peter is survived by his wife, Brenda and three sons.

His funeral will take place at 1pm on February 10 at Wilford Hill, Crematorium, Nottingham.

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Greenkeepers keen to maintain course

Greenkeepers keen to maintain course: Parkview Golf Club’s green-keeping team has completed a five-day project to mow about three kilometres of the verges along the golf course perimeter.

The project, at an estimated cost of R15 000 is part of the club’s embracing programme to secure the environmental integrity of the course, according to club director, James Searson.

Greenkeepers keen to maintain course

“We are proud to contribute to the enhancement of Parkview, Greenside and Emmarentia where we can,” he said, “and work hard to ensure that the club is kept in top condition not just for golfers’ enjoyment but to add value to the surrounding neighbourhood.”

Searson said the club employs a cleaner whose sole task is to continually remove litter, especially plastic, from the ‘sluit’ through the course, to prevent as much as possible of the litter fouling the watercourse downstream. The process removes tonnes of rubbish each year.

To assist municipal engineers to combat the erosion of the sides of the sluit, the club has opened the property to them and their contractors to set up a site office to store their equipment and gain easier access to affected areas. To limit water usage on the course, the club draws non-potable ‘grey’ water (unfit for human use) directly from the Braamfontein Spruit in terms of its riparian rites, pumps into a dam and then filters and sprays it onto the course. To combat invasive polyphagous shot-hole-borer (PSHB) that has infected some trees and threatens many trees throughout South Africa, the club has engaged an arborist to assist it to control the pest through spraying.

Searson added, “Because we see our club as an integral part of the local community, we offer residents walking and social memberships and welcome casual visitors to a round of golf or a drink or meal on our ever-popular balcony.”

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Cricket groundsman to stand down

Cricket groundsman to stand down: He has become one of the recognisable figures in north-east cricket over the last 20 years.

But now, Kenny McCurdie, the head groundsman at Aberdeenshire CC, has confirmed he is stepping down from the role at the end of March.

Cricket groundsman to stand down

Regarded as one of the country’s best pitch preparers, McCurdie has won a string of national awards  – he was groundsman of the year seven times in 11 seasons from 2000 to 2011 – and worked with Cricket Scotland in getting Mannofield ready for high-profile international matches against the likes of England and New Zealand.

Just last summer, he was responsible for the venue which staged the inaugural World Cricket League matches between the Scots, Oman and Papua New Guinea, all of which were played despite the poor weather which ravaged the domestic season.

He also toiled tirelessly with his Shire colleagues to repair the damage after the ground fell victim to vandals in 2011.

McCurdie told the Press and Journal: “There have been many highlights during my tenure, but the job is all about flexibility and the fact you need to learn to be able to work with Nature, not against it.

“It is especially gratifying, having had a poor week of weather, still being able to unveil a quality pitch on a Saturday and although, as a groundsman, you’ll not be able to please all the people all the time, I’ll be glad to shed my thick skin when I hang up my boots.”

Not even having his arm in a sling in 2014 – after he tore a muscle – could prevent him from carrying out his duties before and after the Scotland v England contest.

McCurdie has confirmed he will be leaving Mannofield at the start of the new season for decidedly warmer climes in Gran Canaria.

But he is justly proud of producing constantly good pitches at the game’s most northerly ODI venue which for many years boasted the world’s highest one-day score – when New Zealand scored 402 for 2 against Ireland in 2008.

Former Scotland bowler, Paul Hoffmann, said he had learned a huge amount from talking to McCurdie down the years, before himself becoming a groundsman.

He added: “He gave me so many tips and I always thought he had the best job in the world, doing something he loves and living at the ground.

“He knows so much about the science, but, most of all, he is brilliant groundsman and a wonderful, kind gentleman.”

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Michael Davie wins BIGGA award

Michael Davie wins BIGGA award: Greenkeeper Michael Davie – who set up a mental health support group to help his fellow professionals in the turf industry – has picked up the top award at the British and International Golf Greenkeepers Association’s annual convention.

Davie, the course manager at Hazel Grove Golf Club, in Stockport, has tirelessly supported many BIGGA members and other greenkeepers, having overcome periods of depression in his own life.

Michael Davie wins BIGGA award

In recognition of the incredible effort he has put in to supporting his fellow greenkeepers, Michael was awarded with the Outstanding Contribution of the Year Award, sponsored by Jacobsen.

After receiving the award, Michael Davie said: “I’m exceptionally humbled to receive this. It’s totally unexpected and really amazing.

“I’m retiring from greenkeeping in a few months and I hope the extra time that gives me will allow me to develop the mental health side of things.

“I’m looking into how I can try and help as many people as possible, so this is just the start!”

Michael established the ‘Greenkeepers mental health support group’ on Facebook so his peers could come together to support each other.

Michael also hosts a regular meet-up in Manchester, where greenkeepers discuss issues and provide a helping hand.

The UK’s best and brightest greenkeepers were recognised at a dazzling awards ceremony hosted by the British and International Golf Greenkeepers Association at the opening night of BTME 2020.

BTME is the UK’s leading exhibition for those in the golf greenkeeping and sportsturf industries, with more than 5,000 BIGGA members, industry leaders and influencers expected through the doors of the Harrogate Convention Centre for the duration of the three-event.

The traditional curtain-raiser of the exhibition is the BIGGA Welcome Celebration, sponsored by Campey Turf Care Systems and hosted by television presenter Naga Munchetty.

A number of awards were handed out to BIGGA members who have done extraordinary things throughout their careers.

The Outstanding Contribution award is one of three BIGGA Awards given out to members during the event.

The other two are the Championship Greenkeeping Performance of the Year – sponsored by Rigby Taylor – and the Greenkeeping Project of the Year sponsored by Baroness and Kubota.

Grant Peters and the team at Parkstone Golf Club in Poole were winners of the Championship Greenkeeping Performance of the Year Award after successfully hosting the Ladies’ European Amateur Championship, in July, which was won by Berkhamsted’s Alice Hewson.

Also nominated in the same category were Craig Haldane’s Gleneagles team for the hosting the 2019 Solheim Cup, and Graham Brumpton and the team at Ipswich Golf Club, which staged the English Ladies’ Open Amateur Championship at Purdis Heath last summer.

The Greenkeeping Project of the Year Award was won by Darren Anderson MG and the team at Cheshire’s Bromborough Golf Club.

The team replaced a 46-year-old irrigation system, alongside rebuilding greenside bunkers. Completing the work in-house, it is estimated that the greenkeepers saved the club around £150,000.

Also nominated in the same category were Master Greenkeeper Andrew Kerr’s team at Surrey’s Surbiton Golf Club and Robert George’s team at Essex’s Thorndon Park Golf Club.

For the first time, a new set of prizes were introduced at the BIGGA Welcome Celebration.

The BIGGA Excellence in Communication Awards sponsored by Campey Turf Care Systems seek to recognise those BIGGA members who have embraced communication as a vital tool available to the modern greenkeeper.

Awards for the best use of social media and work in the community will be handed on the second day BTME on the Campey Turf Care stand, but at the BIGGA Welcome Celebration, the winner of the Innovation and Thought Leadership Award was unveiled.

The award is given to the BIGGA member who had written the most thought-provoking article for BIGGA’s monthly magazine, Greenkeeper International, with Ryun Holden, of Switzerland’s Golf Club Wylihof, claiming the inaugural prize for his feature discussing the importance of conveying a positive message from the greenkeeping team to golfers at their club.

Ryun received a £750 cash prize and all-expenses paid trip to Florida, where he will visit the Campey Air2g2 factory, Daytona International Speedway, TPC Sawgrass and TIAA Bank Field, the home of the NFL’s Jacksonville Jaguars.

BIGGA chief executive Jim Croxton said: “I take immense pride in the BIGGA Welcome Celebration as it is the opportunity for our association to recognise the unbelievable hard work and dedication that BIGGA members all over the world demonstrate every day of their working lives.

“As we saw once again through the story of Michael Davie, it can become all too easy to get caught up in all the negativity that surrounds the golf industry.

“Yet there are many passionate and hardworking greenkeepers who have dedicated their careers to ensuring this great industry has a strong and vibrant future.

“BIGGA is nothing if not a community where members can come together to support each other through the bad times and the good.

“Thank-you to all our sponsors and to everyone who came along to support this brilliant event.”

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Winning bid announced for charity auction

Winning bid announced for charity auction: Maskinia, the Authorised Doosan Construction Equipment Dealer in Sweden based in Linköping, is delighted to announce that the winning bid of SEK 202,000 (19,100 Euros) was made by local company, CN:s Gräv AB, in the company’s on-line charity auction of a new Doosan DX10z 1 tonne mini-excavator to raise funds to fight prostate cancer.

Held as part of Sweden’s anti-prostate cancer campaign, Mustaschkampen, the DX10z auction was run in collaboration with suppliers, RF System and Engcon, and in partnership with the auction site, Klaravik.

Winning bid announced for charity auction

Doosan DX10z Blue Edition

Painted in the same blue colour used by the Mustaschkampen campaign, the DX10z carries the Mustaschkampen ‘moustache’ logo and the logos of the participating companies, RF System, Engcon and Klaravik. Designated by Maskinia as the Doosan DX10z Blue Edition, the machine has been delivered to CN:s Gräv AB, equipped with a new tiltrotator from RF System and new buckets from Engcon.

In a press announcement, CN:s Gräv AB expressed great joy and pride in being able to contribute to the fight against prostate cancer, a form of cancer that affects many people in the Linköping area. CN:s Gräv AB had been interested in the DX10z model from Doosan, so the company saw the auction as the perfect opportunity to contribute to the fight against cancer at the same time as bringing home the superior machine in its class.

Raising Funds to Fight Cancer

Two years ago, during the Svenska Maskinmässan 2018 Fair in Sweden, Maskinia auctioned off a unique black edition Doosan DX140W-5 wheeled excavator, which brought in SEK 760000 (71,850 Euros), which was divided into three equal parts between the three organizations, the Breast Cancer Association, the Prostate Cancer Association and the Child Cancer Foundation.

For more on Doosan construction equipment, visit the website: www.doosanequipment.eu

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