Posts

Anthracnose: Interactions with the disease triangle

Anthracnose: Interactions with the disease triangle: Anthracnose of turf is caused by the pathogen Colletotrichum cereale. The disease primarily affects intensely managed turf surfaces because of the considerable stresses that these environments place on the host plants.

This article describes phases within the lifecycle of anthracnose of turf (figure 1) in the context of the three aspects of the disease triangle; pathogen, host and environment.

Biotrophic phase

Simplified lifecycle of Colletotrichum cereale, the anthracnose pathogen that affects turfgrass.

Simplified lifecycle of Colletotrichum cereale, the anthracnose pathogen that affects turfgrass.

The pathogen establishes within the host without causing symptoms of disease.

  • Pathogen

During the biotrophic phase of the anthracnose lifecycle, the pathogen establishes itself within the host plant without alerting the plant to the requirement to respond defensively. It does this by extending primary hyphae, root-like filaments, between the plant cells without actually entering the cells. The pathogen further disguises its presence from the plant using a process called deacetylation, in which chitin on the hyphae is converted to chitosan (Muench, et al., 2008).

  • Host

The plant does not respond defensively to the pathogen because the hyphae do not enter the plant cells and the presence of chitin, which primes plants to activate defensive mechanisms, is hidden. However, even at this early stage of infection, the pathogen may affect its host negatively by creating a nutrient sink at the site of infection; thus, increasing the nutrients availability for the pathogen whilst reducing the nutrients that are fulfilling plant functions.

  • Environment

Extended periods of leaf wetness allow the pathogen to penetrate the host plant and for the biotrophic phase of development to commence. Practices that reduce leaf wetness; such as use of surfactants and physical removal of dews will help to reduce pathogen establishment at this stage.

Foliar blight on a Poa annua sward showing the characteristic yellowing of leaves and diagnostic black setae.

Foliar blight on a Poa annua sward showing the characteristic yellowing of leaves and diagnostic black setae.

Necrotrophic phase

The pathogen penetrates into plant tissues and disease symptoms are observed

  • Pathogen

Necrotrophic growth is characterised by the development of secondary hyphae which penetrate into plant cells. This growth is accompanied by the production of phytotoxins which degrade plant tissue, providing the fungi with a further nutrient source. This phase of growth for anthracnose pathogens which affect other plants typically occurs within 72 hours after the initiation of the biotrophic phase  (Mims & Vaillancourt, 2002). The exact timing is not yet known for Colletotrichum cereale, the pathogen that infects turfgrass.

  • Host

There are two distinctive forms of anthracnose infection during the necrotrophic phase; basal rot and foliar blight (figure 2). It is likely that this symptomatic variance is caused by infection occurring in different parts of the plant.

Foliar blight is characterised by yellow (Poa annua) or reddish (Agrostis stolonifera) lesions on leaves and a water-soaked appearance.

Basal rot is characterised by symptoms in the lower stem or root. The infected tissue at the base of the plant appears dark brown to black with the leaf sheaths above appearing orange to yellow but without foliar lesions.

  • Environment

Development of the disease into the necrotrophic phase is favoured by conditions that put the grass plant under abiotic stress; including low fertility, close mowing, compaction, heat, drought, low light levels and poor drainage. Historic records and weather forecasts are essential to determining when to undertake actions which will minimise the impacts of potential stressors on the plant.

Relevant stresses may be current or historical. For example, the considerable metabolic requirement in spring of Poa annua to produce seedheads takes photosynthate away from roots and shoots prior to a stressful time in the growing season and could weaken the host increasing its susceptibility to infection.

Colletotrichum spp grown in laboratory conditions on potato dextrose agar showing acervuli with diagnostic black setae producing conidia.

Colletotrichum spp grown in laboratory conditions on potato dextrose agar showing acervuli with diagnostic black setae producing conidia.

Reproductive phase

The pathogen spreads infective material to other areas

  • Pathogen

The reproductive phase begins with the development of fruiting bodies called acervuli within which the conidia, or spores, are produced (figure 3). Conidia can be transported on the wind or mechanically. Following contact with another susceptible plant, they can adhere to it by producing a suction cup called an appressorium. The pathogen then forces a highly specialised hyphae called a penetration peg into the plant resulting in the initiation of the biotrophic phase.

  • Host

During the reproductive phase black hair like structures known as setae which project from the acervuli on infected plant tissues are visible with a x10 hand lens. These structures are key diagnostic features for this pathogen when it develops as foliar blight (figure 2 & 3).

  • Environment

Warm, humid weather and increased light intensity are the primary environmental factors controlling the development of conidia. Laboratory studies indicate that Colletotrichum cereale produces conidia at temperatures between 24-32°C with increased maturity of conidia observed at 28°C compared with lower temperatures (Wang & Kerns, 2017). Once conidia have been excreted from the acervuli in a water-soluble matrix they can be spread by wind, water, or human activity but need continued leaf surface moisture to establish.

Research shows that wounding of the host plant through maintenance practices such as verticutting, top dressing and rolling does not increase the incidence of disease as the pathogen does not rely upon entry through wounds or weakened tissues due to its ability to develop a penetration peg.

This article has been written in conjunction with Dr Abigail Graceson and Tom Wood.

Dr Abigail Graceson

As a Technical Manager within the Agrovista Amenity Technical Department, Dr Abigail Graceson draws upon both her practical skills and academic research experience. In addition to her eight years’ experience as a professional gardener & horticulturalist; Dr Graceson spent nine years as a researcher specialising in horticulture, growing media and green roofs.

Tom Wood

Amenity specialist for the Yorkshire region, Tom Wood holds a first class bachelor’s degree in Sportsturf Science and Management (UCLan) which he combines with over ten years’ practical turf management experience. Over this time Tom has amassed a broad range of knowledge and skills sourced from a variety of fields including education, golf courses and technical sales.

References

Mims, C. W. & Vaillancourt, L. J., 2002. Ultrastructural characterization of infection and colonization of maize leaves by Colletotrichum graminicola, and by a C. graminicola pathogenicity mutant. Genetics and resistance, 92(7), pp. 803-812.

Muench, S. et al., 2008. The hemibiotrophic lifestyle of Colletotrichum species. Journal of plant physiology, Volume 165, pp. 41-51.

Wang, Y. & Kerns, J. P., 2017. Temperature effects on formation of appressoria and sporulation of colletotrichum cereale on two turfgrass species. International Turfgrass Society Research Journal, Volume 3, pp. 123-132.

More information on this subject can be found on the Agrovista Amenity Academy. The Agrovista Amenity Academy is an online learning resource with courses and lessons created on a range of areas of turf management and for all products sold by Agrovista Amenity.

For more information about Agrovista UK, visit www.agrovista.co.uk/amenity

For the latest industry news visit turfmatters.co.uk/news

Get all of the big headlines, pictures, opinions and videos on stories that matter to you.

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram for fun, fresh and engaging content.

You can also find us on Facebook for more of your must-see news, features, videos and pictures from Turf Matters.

GKB bring the Sandspreader 400 to Coventry

GKB bring the Sandspreader 400 to Coventry: GKB Machines are known for their robust and reliable groundskeeping machines, and at the heart of their wide range of products fits the GKB Sandspreaders.

Thought of as the premier choice in the top dresser market, the SP series distributes different materials evenly over a field with precision and efficiency, and are available in a variety of sizes to suit the needs of sports grounds and courses.

GKB bring the Sandspreader 400 to Coventry

GKB bring the Sandspreader 400 to Coventry

The latest delivery saw the arrival of the SP400 – the largest Top Dresser in the GKB arsenal – to Lakeside Ground Maintenance in Coventry. Director of the Coventry firm, Gareth Fowler-Simons commented: “I was after a bigger spreader that was also suitable to travel on the road between sites. I’ve only heard good things about GKB, and with up to 95 per cent of the work we do being top dressing and renovations related, this really was the obvious choice for us.”

Being only the second SP400 to reach the UK – the first arrived in Scotland some months ago – it has naturally drawn a lot of attention among ground staff already. As effective sanding is crucial for the long-term preservation of sports fields, GKB expect these to be the first of many SP400s delivered to UK grounds and courses.

Tom Shinkins, GKB Machines UK Operations Director admitted: “The Sandspreader offers more than a traditional top dresser, giving workers the ability to control how much material gets spread and where, evenly with no fuss. We are delighted have an SP400 now in operation in England, and are sure that Lakeside Ground Maintenance will have many fantastic years using it.”

GKB bring the Sandspreader 400 to Coventry

GKB bring the Sandspreader 400 to Coventry

GKB Sandspreader main features:

  • Sturdy wheelbase for perfect stability and weight dispersion
  • Adjustable conveyor belt speed
  • Double hydraulically driven, precisely adjustable spreading discs
  • Road legal
  • Uniquely shaped bunker for good visibility and efficient sand discharge

The SP400 is available to order from your local GKB Machines dealer, find them online local via the GKB website now.

For the latest industry news visit turfmatters.co.uk/news

Get all of the big headlines, pictures, opinions and videos on stories that matter to you.

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram for fun, fresh and engaging content.

You can also find us on Facebook for more of your must-see news, features, videos and pictures from Turf Matters.

TurfCare bolsters presence in the Southwest

TurfCare bolsters presence in the Southwest: TurfCare announce Andy Matthews joins the company in a technical sales support role.

Andy Matthews. 40 years within the industry mostly within the independent school’s sector, starting in June 1981 at Bradfield College as an apprentice where he studied Greenkeeping and sports turf at Berkshire college of Agriculture. He left Bradfield as Deputy Head Groundsman in 1993 to take up a position as Head Groundsman at Birkbeck College in Greenford. In 1997 when he accepted a position as Grounds Manager at Taunton School in Somerset where he met his wife Tori. In 2001 they moved to Harrow School to be the Grounds Manager.  During his time at Harrow, he oversaw the £5million upgrade of the sporting facilities. In 2011 he accepted a position at Clifton College in Bristol. where he has hosted international soccer, a rugby world cup training camp and county cricket.

TurfCare bolsters presence in the Southwest

TurfCare bolsters presence in the Southwest

“We are incredibly pleased that Andy is joining the TurfCare team said TurfCare UK Sales Manager Daniel Jones. “His background and experience will allow our entire team to further grow and support our customers in the Southwest. TurfCare General Manager Jim Holden said that we are delighted to welcome Andy to the team. He has 40 years of industry experience which offers the company and our customers access to his vast amount of experience and knowledge. We look forward to working with Andy in the next chapter of his profession.

“I am excited to join the TurfCare team and support our customers in the Southwest Region helping turfgrass managers select the correct products to match their agronomic needs, TurfCare offer some of the best products in the industry with their world-wide brands “Matthews said.

Andy will start with TurfCare from the 2nd of August and can be contacted through the following details 07584 046834 amatthews@turfcare.eu  +44 1425 472102   www.turfcare.eu

For the latest industry news visit turfmatters.co.uk/news

Get all of the big headlines, pictures, opinions and videos on stories that matter to you.

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram for fun, fresh and engaging content.

You can also find us on Facebook for more of your must-see news, features, videos and pictures from Turf Matters.

The Dennis E-Series is here

The Dennis E-Series is here: A number of industry press recently visited the Dennis & SISIS headquarters in Derbyshire to receive an exclusive look at the company’s new and exciting range of environmentally friendly mowers called the E-Series.

For many years, turf professionals have been choosing Dennis Mowers for their superb cut quality and reliability, and anticipation quickly started building when the company announced its new battery-powered range.

The Dennis E-Series is here

The Dennis E-Series is here

Leaving no stone unturned, Dennis Mowers spent over three years working with carefully selected partners to develop a range of quality battery-powered equipment.

In addressing the press, Managing Director Ian Howard said: “Reliable and long-lasting solutions are a must have for our customers and in this rapidly developing technology field we have chosen our partners very carefully. For us it was important to create no compromise alternatives to our petrol mowers, which would not need constantly re-charging or swapping batteries – it was imperative that they last the distance.

“The hard work has paid off and now we can unveil our first market ready equipment befitting of the Dennis badge.”

The Dennis E-Series range currently consists of three products:

ES-860

Users of the Dennis G860 cylinder mower will no doubt see familiarities in the new ES-860. This 34” battery powered turf management system delivers maximum versatility and the range of 13 interchangeable cassette options provide a solution to many day-to-day maintenance tasks such as cutting, scarifying and brushing. The power of the battery system ensures the machine is capable of cutting at least 2 pitches on a single charge or verticutting a full pitch without anxiety. Furthermore, current G860 cassettes will also fit the ES-860, meaning that customers will not have to purchase additional cassettes, reducing initial costs and allowing for a simple and easy change from petrol to battery machines.

ES-34R

The ES-34R rotary mower has twin contra rotating blades with the height of cut controlled by an easy to use ‘click’ system. Suction and blade speed can be adapted to meet the most challenging collection conditions.The mower is also available with optional front wheels, smooth or wiele roller, has excellent sight lines and cuts approximately 2 pitches on a single charge.

ES-36

Based on the Dennis Premier, the ES-36 provides a perfect finish every time. The envied Dennis stripes are easy to achieve which is also helped by a 3-section rear roller. The powerful battery system allows the addition of a trailer seat to be attached and still achieve a minimum of 20km of cutting. A uniquely developed micro adjuster makes it very easy to set the bottom blade to cylinder.

The machines feature a robust LCD keypad screen which provides the operator with a multitude of information options including speed, clip rate, service checks, lifetime running reports and battery information. The E-Series range of mowers take just 2 hours for an ultra-fast full battery recharge utilising a British 110A battery and will help turf professionals meet sustainability and carbon neutral goals. The ultra-low HAV’s and noise allows operators to use the machines for a full day in any environment and along with the low maintenance, very low lifetime costs and significant cost savings on fuel are all benefits of the Dennis E-Series range.

The press had the opportunity to see all three machines in action and even received an exclusive glimpse of the new ES-510 ahead of its forthcoming launch. This new mower is based on the Dennis FT510 – which is, historically, the company’s most popular machine.

Furthermore, Ian Howard revealed that by the end of October every existing Dennis product will have a battery-powered alternative and that work had already begun on the SISIS range too.

In an enlightening presentation, Sales and Marketing Manager Roger Moore offered an insight into how the company has fared since the last press event in 2016. Roger revealed how both Dennis and SISIS have seen year-on-year sales growth and despite the pandemic, are on track to witness a record-breaking year.

This, according to Roger, has all been possible due to the company’s commitment to continual investment – investment in facilities, marketing, exhibitions, seminars, staff, export and of course products.

A factory tour, where all the Dennis and SISIS products are manufactured, gave the press members the chance to see first-hand just some of these investments. The group were also given rare access to the All British Precision factory where components for the machines are meticulously produced.

“It was a pleasure to open our doors to the press and introduce them to the E-Series,” said Ian. “The launch of the E-Series marks a monumental period in the history of Dennis Mowers, and soon to be SISIS. It is the start of an exciting new era.”

For further information or a no obligation demonstration, please contact Dennis 01332 824 777 or visit www.dennisuk.com

For more news, reviews and insightful views, you can follow Dennis on Twitter and Instagram @DennisMowers and like the company’s Facebook page – www.facebook.com/DennisMowersUK You can also view the latest Dennis videos by visiting www.youtube.com/DennisMowers

For the latest industry news visit turfmatters.co.uk/news

Get all of the big headlines, pictures, opinions and videos on stories that matter to you.

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram for fun, fresh and engaging content.

You can also find us on Facebook for more of your must-see news, features, videos and pictures from Turf Matters.

Get the most from your machine

Get the most from your machine: Nothing is more important than keeping machines running, which is why the role of servicing and maintenance is key to the success of every business. From the correct way to tilt the mower, to the wrong way to clean spark plugs, Kawasaki Engines looks at how to get the most from your machine.

Martin Cook, parts and technical manager and Dave Dunwoody, technical and after sales specialist, both from Kawasaki Engines have decades of engineering experience and provide advice on common mistakes, tips and ideas for keeping your machinery, and your business, running.

Get the most from your machine

Get the most from your machine

No one knows a mower better than the person using it, so trust your instincts, says Dave: “We’ve been called out to a premiership football club to service a pedestrian mower because the operator could sense a change in the precision of the cutting through the vibrations of the machine. The mower was hesitating and the blade slightly slowing down. We found an issue with the carburettor and while it didn’t affect the mowing quality as such, it did affect cutting the pattern into the pitch.

“So, while it sounds simple, maybe even obvious, it’s important to use your senses to detect changes in the machine. Is there a new or unusual smell, noise or feeling such as vibrations? In the case of two-stroke engines, it could be that the fuel to oil ratio isn’t right. The ratio should be 50 to 1 (50 parts fuel to 1 part oil), so, for example, five litres of petrol will need 100ml of the correct two-stroke oil adding to it. We recommend using a two-stroke mixing bottle. Too little oil lubricating the engine, and it will dry and seize. Too much and there will be smoke, soot and fumes. It doesn’t take long for either to happen!

“We’ve seen cases where the fuel for a two-stroke engine was put in a four-stroke engine, and vice versa, an easy mistake to make when the job is busy and the day is long. Therefore, we strongly recommend marking up the cans and putting them in separate places to reduce the chances of this happening.”

When it comes to servicing we’ve seen some common mistakes. For example, it’s important not to delay routine servicing or skip the daily oil and air checks. Definitely don’t clean spark plugs with a steel wire brush as it leaves metal traces and will cause the plug to short out.

When it comes to maintenance these simple things will make sure you don’t incur problems later says Martin: “Check liquid levels on a flat surface, an incline will show more/less depending on which way it’s tilting. During normal deck inspection, tilting the mower the wrong way will lead to a flooding of fuel! The carburettor should always be uppermost. When jet-washing the machines after a hard day’s work, make sure to dry off excess water as pooling can easily damage the electricals. Using WD-40 is great post-wash as it displaces moisture and protects against electrical short circuits.

“Always consider where you put things – if you take off a jacket and pop it on the back of a zero-turn machine, make sure you don’t cover the engine fan as that will lead to overheating and can cause the engine to seize.

“Fuel has changed over the last few years, ethanol is now added to all petrol up to 10 percent, the reason for this is to decrease CO2 emissions. But ethanol is highly corrosive and hygroscopic (absorbs water), that’s why we are constantly telling people to drain and purge equipment for the winter months. Many people argue that they have a 40-year-old chainsaw and they have never had to drain it so why now? This is where we remind them about the ethanol content of fuel and due to recent RoHS directives, we are restricted to the materials we use in the carburettors. Older machines made use of chromium cadmium and lead, thankfully we no longer have these hazardous substances in our equipment, but it is now more important to drain and purge equipment before the winter shut down.”

The importance of genuine quality parts can never be underestimated, continues Martin: “It never pays to shop for the lowest cost parts to save money. We’ve seen an engine destroyed because an oil filter from a motorcycle was fitted. The filter looked the same, but because the fit wasn’t exact, the oil pressure built up and blew the filter apart, taking half the engine casing with it! All that damage, all for the sake of a few pence.”

Following these simple guidelines will not only ensure the utmost productivity from machines but will go a long way to increasing the life of the machine, giving you the most from your investment now and in the future.

To find out more about Kawasaki’s technical support or to learn more about their full engine range, visit https://www.kawasaki-engines.eu/en/

For the latest industry news visit turfmatters.co.uk/news

Get all of the big headlines, pictures, opinions and videos on stories that matter to you.

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram for fun, fresh and engaging content.

You can also find us on Facebook for more of your must-see news, features, videos and pictures from Turf Matters.

Suståne provides the organic solution

Suståne provides the organic solution: Organic solutions to plant nutrition and soil management are becoming an ever-increasing choice at leading sports facilities around the globe, as attention turns to both the impacts of more traditional chemicals and the benefits to the environment of more natural approaches.

Built on over 40 years of research, Suståne Natural Fertiliser has one of the largest ranges of organic-based fertilisers and soil builders developed for all landscape and turf applications.

Suståne provides the organic solution

Suståne provides the organic solution

Suståne is the most comprehensively researched organic fertiliser brand available in today’s market. Over 800 independent studies have been conducted in areas including turf establishment, disease suppression, environmental impact, effects on wildlife and soil improvement – the result of this research is a biologically-active, organic product range built for agronomic performance. Suståne’s aerobic, thermophilic composting process is the most environmentally sound method for recycling of agricultural residue, generating no methane and fewer greenhouse gases than other organic stabilisation processes. With the manufacturing impact on the environment low, the benefits of Suståne to the landscape are many.

Through the unique process, the organic feedstock is concentrated into a nutrient rich humus – rich in microbial diversity yet low in biological oxygen demand. Suståne’s microbial diversity index of 4.5 is critical to many soil and plant functions, providing optimal microbiology for plants to thrive. The release of nitrogen is slow, predictable and efficient, reducing loss to the environment through volatilisation, leaching or immobilisation and provides a long-lasting, sustainable source of plant nutrition and soil improvements.

There are formulations within the Suståne range suitable for every turf type and agronomic application, from 100% organic to higher nitrogen natural-base formulations, each with unique release rates and nutrient profiles. New to the range in 2021 is Suståne Soil Regen® – a soil amendment product formulated to improve soil structure by increasing infiltration rates and the profiles’ ability to hold nutrients and moisture.

The Suståne range is available through a network of approved distributors globally, with dedicated Regional Managers on hand to provide tailored, technical advice.

For the latest industry news visit turfmatters.co.uk/news

Get all of the big headlines, pictures, opinions and videos on stories that matter to you.

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram for fun, fresh and engaging content.

You can also find us on Facebook for more of your must-see news, features, videos and pictures from Turf Matters.

Greenkeepers to the fore

Greenkeepers to the fore: Episode three of Syngenta Golf’s new docuseries Changing the Business of Golf is streaming now – and follows the greenkeeping team as they transform Stanedge Golf Club.

‘On Course for Change’ features Head Greenkeeper Christian ‘CJ’ Johnson as he oversees a major course upgrade while coping with new parenthood; Greenkeeper David Morgan renovates an overgrown par-three; and we meet new recruit James Wyatt, a pilot grounded by the pandemic, as he swaps runways for fairways.

Greenkeepers to the fore

Greenkeepers to the fore

Watch now: syngentagolf.com/changing-business-golf

“Nobody really notices the role of the greenkeeper,” says James, who is seeing golf from the greenkeeper’s perspective for the first time. “Everybody comes along, they play their golf, they expect the greens to be tidy, they expect the grass to be in good condition, but you don’t tend to see all of this as a player.”

But it’s not just customers who have high expectations. New course owner and PGA Professional Fame Tate believes course conditions are critically important to the customer experience – and the long-term success of her business.

“The golf course was my number one priority for change,” explains Fame. “If we were going to get people back, it was the golf course that was going to have to change.

“I want it to look absolutely immaculate. And as much as I wanted to wave my magic wand, make grass grow and make the greens perfect and do all these things instantly, I very quickly realised things take time.”

Join Fame, CJ, James and David as the turf team transform the Stanedge course to meet the demands of a growing membership.

And catch previous episodes following Fame’s remarkable one-woman mission to change golf, transform the customer experience and make her club a friendly and inclusive community venue.

Watch all episodes, streaming now, on Syngenta Golf: syngentagolf.com/changing-business-golf

For the latest industry news visit turfmatters.co.uk/news

Get all of the big headlines, pictures, opinions and videos on stories that matter to you.

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram for fun, fresh and engaging content.

You can also find us on Facebook for more of your must-see news, features, videos and pictures from Turf Matters.

BAGMA sold to the AEA

BAGMA sold to the AEA: The British Independent Retailers Association (Bira), has transferred the ownership of BAGMA, the British Agricultural and Garden Machinery Association, to the Agricultural Engineers Association (AEA) with effect from the July 1, 2021.

After a long relationship between Bira and BAGMA, this has been a difficult decision. However, it is in the best interests of both BAGMA and Bira. The AEA is more aligned to the industry sector BAGMA operates in and this will enable BAGMA to offer more support relevant to its members’ business needs.

BAGMA sold to the AEA

BAGMA sold to the AEA

Bira will maintain a working relationship with BAGMA and the AEA for at least the next 12 months, with members of BAGMA still having access to the services available from Bira, including legal advice and Bira Direct.

BAGMA Director Keith Christian and his team, Kari Hearn and Richard Jenkins, will be transferring with BAGMA, ensuring the all-important continuity in the running and operations of BAGMA.

Andrew Goodacre, CEO of Bira, said: “I, and my colleagues in Bira, are very proud to have worked closely with the BAGMA team and BAGMA members over the past 25 years. There is a strong identity among BAGMA members that is to be admired.”

Ruth Bailey, CEO of the AEA, said: “The AEA is absolutely delighted to have the opportunity to be working with BAGMA and feel extremely positive about future developments and advantages that could be brought by the two organisations joining forces.

“For many years, there has been a clear working relationship between the two Associations but in more recent times the links and directional cooperation have become closer and closer and more aligned. As a collaborative voice to government and business, there is huge potential in adding impact and in bringing a difference to the sector.

“While the AEA sees a great amount of synergy between the two organisations, it fully respects the need, however, for the continuity of membership services from BAGMA to its members and to recognise the inherent strength that the BAGMA membership brings. It is for this reason that it is very important that the highly valued and distinct identity of BAGMA is maintained and supported independently.

“We look forward to providing a clear voice to industry yet maintaining the rich heritage of each of the Associations and the value of services to their respective members.

Peter Arrand, BAGMA President, said: “The BAGMA Council of Representatives unanimously supported the purchase of BAGMA by the AEA. “The acquisition will secure a future home within industry and allow the heritage and strong brand built up over 100 years as a dealer trade association to continue. There are many synergies between the two organisations which will enable a stronger representation for the industry we operate in whilst not losing sight of the individual needs of BAGMA members.

“The advantages of being a BAGMA member have been retained and we can look forward to a bright and collaborative future.”

Keith Christian, Director of BAGMA, added: “Having been a part of the former British Hardware Federation (BHF) now the British Independent Retailers Association (Bira) for the past 25 years It may be a surprise to some for BAGMA to be moving to new home.

“BAGMA’s 103-year history has always been intertwined with the AEA and whilst we represent different factions within the industry, we share a common goal in supporting the industry through both dealerships, suppliers and manufacturers.

“Whilst BAGMA will remain as an independent dealer’s association within its new home, it is expected that there will be new working relationships that will benefit BAGMA members in the future to come.”

For the latest industry news visit turfmatters.co.uk/news

Get all of the big headlines, pictures, opinions and videos on stories that matter to you.

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram for fun, fresh and engaging content.

You can also find us on Facebook for more of your must-see news, features, videos and pictures from Turf Matters.

Wet Sand no issue with the Dakota 412

Wet Sand no issue with the Dakota 412: As the most northern links golf course on the United Kingdom mainland, having a top dresser that can spread wet sand like the Dakota 412 from Campey Turf Care Systems is a must at Scotland’s Reay Golf Club. 

The James Braid designed course is positioned on the edge of Sandside Bay with views of the Pentland Firth and the North Atlantic from every hole. The course and its stunning views have been under the control of Head Greenkeeper Jason Norwood, since March 2021, with the new man aiming to put his stamp on the course, starting with the greens.

Wet Sand no issue with the Dakota 412

Wet Sand no issue with the Dakota 412

As the sole full-time member of staff for the main 18-hole course and junior three-hole, Jason’s priority is the greens, with volunteers giving up two days a week to assist with the fairways and roughs. The limited time available to Jason needs to be spent working, and with the Dakota 412, he’s able to top-dress as and when he needs to regardless of the sand moisture.

“I’ve tried to put my own stamp on things here with different types of machinery and different ways of working, and the club has really been on board with that, and one of those things has been buying the new Dakota top dresser,” Jason explains.

“The equipment we originally had couldn’t cope well with wet sand; it was more of a large-scale fertiliser spreader. As you can imagine at the top of Scotland, there’s a lot of rain about so any sand that we do have is normally quite wet, so that was one of the main features of the Dakota for us because it can deal with that quite easily and we still get a good even spread with it.

“We really want to push forward and make use of the North Coast 500 tourist route, which is literally on our doorstep; it passes directly in front of us, so we get a lot of passing visitors now, and I think all year-round performing greens are the main thing golfers are after on a golf course so it’s making sure that we can provide that for them.

“We’ve had the machine since the middle of April, but because of the weather chances to get it out have been limited. I’ve trialled different settings on our junior course greens to get what we want for the main course, and it’s been good so far.

“With it having four wheels the weight is distributed incredibly well, so it doesn’t leave a mark on the greens, and the first time I used it you’d have no idea that anything had been done or any heavy equipment had been over the greens it because the footprint was minimal.”

The Dakota 412 features accurate and easy to operate calibration with no manual adjustment and has four Ultra-Trac turf tyres on independent floating beam axels for maximum weight distribution, allowing Jason to work without causing viable disruption to the surface.

As part of Campey’s installation, and to help Jason get the most out of the machine, Campey Product Specialist, Richard Heywood, walked him through the various settings and features, which Jason views as an invaluable experience.

Jason explains: “Because we are so far north, there is a lot more to consider when ordering machinery. Something that was great for me was being supplied through my machinery dealer Double A with support from Campey by sending Richard to demonstrate how to use the top dresser to the best of its abilities. This proved invaluable to me not having used one before.

“He went through it all, explained what all the different settings were, how to adjust it all, and that was vital. Having someone who knows how to operate it fully really maximises its performance and helps us get the best out of the machine.”

For the latest industry news visit turfmatters.co.uk/news

Get all of the big headlines, pictures, opinions and videos on stories that matter to you.

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram for fun, fresh and engaging content.

You can also find us on Facebook for more of your must-see news, features, videos and pictures from Turf Matters.

On the horizon podcasts

On the horizon podcasts: Greenkeepers, turf managers and agronomists can now get an invaluable insight into the key agronomy challenges they will face on golf courses over the coming months, by following the podcast, On the horizon with Glenn & Henry.

On the horizon with Glenn & Henry features the Technical Managers of both Syngenta, Glenn Kirby, and ICL’s Henry Bechelet. Together, they tackle hot topics typically to be seen in the months ahead.

On the horizon podcasts

On the horizon podcasts

“We’re looking to help greenkeepers think about strategic planning and decision making for golf course turf management, ahead of issues occurring,” reported Glenn.

“As we move towards a greater emphasis on Integrated Turf Management (ITM), it becomes ever more important to manage conditions and prepare turf health well in advance, typically several weeks or months ahead of problems occurring,” he advocated.

The On the horizon format follows an easy-listening style of discussion that explores the experience and renowned practical understanding of both Henry and Glenn, backed up with their turf science and research knowledge.

Henry added: “The podcast gives us the chance to delve far deeper into specific topics. The discussion it triggers helps to bring together the complex interaction of many day-today aspects of turf management, which creates a more holistic approach to ITM.

“Greater awareness of the implications of what you do to today, to prepare for the challenges of tomorrow, is crucial to make ITM work in practice,” advised Henry.

The podcasts’ availability, through media sources including Spotify, Apple Podcasts and Google, makes the wealth of knowledge readily and freely accessible where and whenever people want to listen – be that on the mower, in the mess room or just catching up in the evening.

Topics for the July episode of On the horizon include:

  • Preventing take-all patch
  • Weather challenges
  • Managing summer stress
  • Anthracnose risks

Previous episodes of On the horizon with Glenn & Henry are all available on all popular podcast platforms.

For the latest industry news visit turfmatters.co.uk/news

Get all of the big headlines, pictures, opinions and videos on stories that matter to you.

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram for fun, fresh and engaging content.

You can also find us on Facebook for more of your must-see news, features, videos and pictures from Turf Matters.