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Toro give $500,000 to Coronavirus efforts

Toro give $500,000 to Coronavirus efforts: The Toro Company (Parent company of Hayter Limited) yesterday announced that it is giving $500,000 to assist families and communities worldwide that have been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Grant funding from the Toro Foundation will span all regions where The Toro Company operates, and will focus on providing food, health and humanitarian assistance to helping people adversely impacted.

Toro give $500,000 to Coronavirus efforts

Toro give $500,000 to Coronavirus efforts

“Supporting our customers and communities is an important part of our culture and core to who we are as a company,” said Rick Olson, chairman and chief executive officer of The Toro Company. “Now more than ever, it is critical that we come together to respond to the unprecedented challenges posed by COVID-19 and to support those most vulnerable in our communities.”

The contributions include commitments to several global nonprofits that are assisting in the relief efforts. This includes the American Red Cross and the International Committee of the Red Cross, Feeding America, the World Food Program, the United Way Worldwide, and United Way organizations in communities where The Toro Company’s employees live and work.

An additional element of the global giving effort includes a special program for its employees who wish to personally give to designated COVID-19 relief organizations. Under the program, The Toro Company will match employee contributions to a nonprofit organization of their choice in support of relief efforts.

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ICL Coronavirus service statement

ICL Coronavirus service statement: As the coronavirus situation continues to develop, we thought it important to inform you about how ICL Turf & Landscape in the UK & Ireland has adapted over the past few days and how we are currently operating.

We are still open for essential business. We are following and adhering to orders, guidelines and procedures issued and published by relevant regulatory authorities and we have adopted appropriate steps and measures within our facilities to minimize the risk of coronavirus.

ICL Coronavirus service statement

ICL Coronavirus service statement

  • All non-essential business travel, including face to face meetings can no longer take place – until further notice
  • Our technical and sales team are working full time and can be reached by telephone, email or video call (Microsoft Teams or Zoom)
  • Our office teams are now working from home to support all customer order processing and accounts
  • Drivers and our warehouse staff are applying stringent safety measures including strict social distancing guidelines and contactless procedures
  • We are stringently reviewing key raw materials and packaging inputs to anticipate any issues affecting manufacturing or supply of product

Our websites www.icl-sf.co.uk and www.icl-sf.ie provide information on all our products.

There is no doubt that these are challenging, unprecedented and uncertain times for everyone.

However please be assured that we are working hard with our partners to ensure that we provide the best possible service to help and support you through this.

Customer Services:

Call  01473 237123 or email prof.sales@icl-group.com

Sales & Technical Contacts:

Ireland – Colman Warde, 00353 8777 99527, colman.warde@icl-group.com

Scotland – Jamie Lees, 07500 992464, Jamie.lees@icl-group.com

North/East – Craig Lalley, 07824 528252, craig.lalley@icl-group.com

Midlands/West – Emma Kilby, 07748 111965, emma.kilby@icl-group.com

South East/ East London – Andrew Pledger, 07387 056659, Andrew.pledger@icl-group.com

South/London/Channel Islands – Darren Hatcher, 07787 697684, darren.hatcher@icl-group.com

South West/ West London – Nick Martin, 07900 666691, nick.martin@icl-group.com

North West – Phil Collinson, 07824, 473699, phil.collinson@icl-group.com

South Central – Matt Nutter, 07810 656240, matthew.nutter@icl-group.com

Landscape & Industrial, UK & Ireland – Barry Browne, 07552 269138, barry.browne@icl-group.com

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Together, we’ll beat coronavirus

Together, we’ll beat coronavirus: We at Turf Matters are well aware of the impact Coronavirus is having on every aspect of our lives.

It is something that has not been faced by any of us in our lifetimes.

Together, we’ll beat coronavirus

Together, we’ll beat coronavirus

We are all trying to get through the next few weeks and months as best as we can. Keeping working, if we are at all able to, helps retain some sort of normality in what are anything but normal times.

We are a small, close-knit industry which is good in so many ways. We always have someone to call on while help is always there when needed. In other ways it is not so good however. Being small makes us more vulnerable and we can lack the resources which help bigger industries cushion themselves through hard times. It can be a hand to mouth existence, something we’ve seen when weather extremes have impacted on various elements of our industry.

It all means we must stick together wherever possible. For that reason we at Turf Matters are giving a shout out to all our partnering companies.

We wish you all well over the difficult times ahead. You can be assured that Turf Matters will be with you, side by side, through it all.

We not only have our health to protect but our futures and we will provide all the help we can to showcase the work you continue to do and perhaps shine a light on the wonderful, often behind the scenes acts of kindness for which our great industry is known.

Let’s take care, let’s stay well, let’s stick together, let’s get through this.

Scott MacCallum, editor

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Coronavirus’ impact on sport

Coronavirus’ impact on sport: The world is witnessing the advance of Coronavirus (COVID-19) and its impacts on a global scale.

The effects of COVID-19, which is already considered a global pandemic by the World Health Organisation, are bringing thousands of cases in every part of the world and will cause brutal economic damage.

Coronavirus' impact on sport

Coronavirus’ impact on sport

The negative economic impact of the pandemic and its recessive reflexes scared the financial market. The economic losses will be gigantic, and the stock markets melt daily around the world because of it.

All decisions imply losses. Damages to teams, leagues and players, but also to an entire production chain that is impacted by the high degree of induction to different economic sectors.

We also have the Tokyo Olympic Games, the biggest event on the planet, which at this time has not the slightest condition to be held. The UEFA EURO Championship has already been postponed from 2020 until 2021.

Rio de Janeiro in 2016 received more than 500,000 foreign tourists, not to mention the millions of domestic tourists, athletes, professionals from different sectors and the press. In London, there were more than 590,000 foreign tourists. At this point, the Olympics would be irresponsible.

The more developed markets are closer to this index. It is the multiplier effect that makes sport a single sector.

The sport’s greatest strength is to gather interest and drag crowds. This impact that can reach 2.5 times the direct revenue is only possible thanks to its dynamism and emotion, which induces the economy and leverages cities and even countries.

There are impacts on an huge production chain, which includes transportation, food, drink, entertainment, product purchase and government taxes.

What is the economic impact of all this?

According to analysis by Sports Value, the global sports market moves US$756bn annually. This is the direct value moved by industry: the USA are responsible for US$420bn and Europe for another US$250bn.

China, the fastest growing market in global sport, makes about US$150bn annually and projects or projected its sports industry to reach revenues of US$350bn over five years.

The industry’s largest revenue source is sports retail, which accounts for more than a third of the global business.

Professional sport, although not the main source of revenue, is undoubtedly the one that most impacts the production chain, with its matchday revenues, sponsorships, TV rights, players’ transfers and its high media and employment character. And obviously its indirect and induced impacts.

Thus, a match with closed gates, the cancellation of competitions or calendar changes, directly impacts the entire industry.

Losses will be inevitable. Projected earnings will be nullified, revenues will plummet, there will be less impact to the sponsors’ business, less tourist flow, ultimately a heavy recession for all those involved with sport.

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Coronavirus tips for greenkeepers

Coronavirus tips for greenkeepers: BIGGA – the British and International Golf Greenkeepers Association – explain how clubs can assist their vital greenkeeping teams during the pandemic.

Greenkeepers are an essential part of keeping a golf club open. The clubhouse may be able to temporarily shut its doors and ask golfers to change at home or in their cars, but if the course isn’t maintained then a club is losing its key asset.

Coronavirus tips for greenkeepers

Coronavirus tips for greenkeepers

In providing advice to greenkeepers, BIGGA is doing what it can to keep golf courses open, primarily for the economic health of the sport, but also because the government is concerned about ‘isolation fatigue’. As it is able to played without direct human contact, golf is a low-risk opportunity to stay active if you’re able to leave the house.

However, if a golf club’s entire greenkeeping team is forced to self-isolate or is unable to work due to illness, then the health of the golf course will be at risk, not just in the immediate future but also long-term as it will take some time to recover and the damage could be substantial.

Spring’s warmer weather means the turf will start growing at an increased rate. If courses can’t be maintained for an extended period then the finer areas – greens in particular – will suffer. Disease occurrence is more likely and once the grass is longer, it can’t just be chopped down to its previous height.

The following is guidance to help keep your greenkeeping team healthy during the current health crisis:

1. Split your team up into separate groups and keep them isolated from each other. Make sure you have groups who are able to complete specialist tasks as a unit, although this may also be an opportunity for trainee members of the team to learn new skills. If you need to speak to members of a different group, call them over the radio or phone, rather than meeting in person. As course manager, you also need to stay separate from the teams otherwise you risk spreading the virus among your team.

2. Allow different groups of staff to start and finish at half hour interviews and stagger their coffee breaks and lunch times. Make sure food and drink is stored in separate compartments and ensure each group completely cleans the breakroom after they have used it.

3. It may be an idea to ask the team to lunch in their cars rather than the mess room. Greenkeepers spend a lot of time working alone and so when they come together for a lunch or coffee break, it is a prime opportunity for the virus to spread. At this time, as much isolation as possible is hugely important.

4. As in all aspects of life at this time, hygiene is essential. For greenkeepers, that doesn’t just mean washing your hands for more than 20 seconds, but also ensuring that any equipment you use is completely and efficiently cleaned after use. Likewise, areas such as communal areas, washrooms and offices should be comprehensively cleaned on a regular basis. The current outbreak is an opportunity for a bit of spring cleaning.

5. There are tools that greenkeepers can use to help protect the course if they are unable to gain access for a period of time. The use of dew dispersant will suppress the formation of dew and reduce turf problems made worse by excess moisture. It will also decrease drying times following rainfall.

6. Growth regulators can be used to slow down the growth of the turf, reducing the need to mow it as frequently. Growth regulators work by causing a temporary halt in the production plant hormones responsible for promoting growth in grasses.

7. A programme of Integrated Pest Management will take a proactive approach to disease control and preventative fungicides can help reduce the instances of disease on the turf.

8. Most importantly, if you’re ill or showing any of the symptoms of coronavirus, stay at home. The golf club will survive without you for a few days, but if you make the entire team ill and indirectly cause the closure of the course, then the consequences could be dire. At times like this, it’s better to be cautious.

9. Being prepared for the worst by developing contingency plans are important and you can find more information about these, such as buddying up with other clubs and training other staff members or volunteers, by checking out the guidance BIGGA and golf’s other membership organisations recently published.

10. Other advice to prevent the spread of coronavirus at golf clubs includes:

  • Leave the flag in the hole at all times
  • Remove rakes and any other pieces of course furniture that golfers may touch – let the greenkeepers rake the bunkers and golfers can wipe their own golf balls on a towel
  • Only pick your own ball up
  • Do not share any equipment, such as golf clubs or rangefinders
  • Try to keep a distance of two metres from your playing partners
  • Don’t shake hands after your game
  • Adjust your catering provision to reduce physical contact – keep a barrier between you, use disposable plates and cups, have hand washing facilities available on every table
  • Prioritise online services for entries, bookings and scoring.
  • Take payments using contactless means.

For more information, visit the BIGGA website, or reach out on Twitter

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