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Groundsman – FEATURED JOB

The Club

Groundsman

Groundsman

Bordering the Thames in Fulham and set in 42 acres of magnificent grounds, The Hurlingham Club is a green oasis of tradition and international renown. Recognised throughout the world as one of Britain’s greatest private members’ clubs.

The Department

The Grounds Team are part of the Estates Department and are made up of 26 professional and highly motivated individuals who pride themselves on the maintenance and upkeep of the prestigious grounds. The grounds of the Club include ten croquet lawns, thirty grass tennis courts, a cricket ground, a nine-hole golf course, two bowling greens and over a hectare of trees, flowers, shrubs and ornamental lawns. It is through the efforts of the Grounds team that the Club’s members are rewarded year on year with award winning sports surfaces and stunning season changing flowerbeds.

The Role

As a Groundsman you will work a 39 hour week with regular weekend work (compulsory but not guaranteed). Typical duties will include:

  • To undertake general turf and grounds duties.
  • Reporting and treating common pests, fungi and diseases.
  • Setting out sports areas.
  • Operating lawnmowers and other horticultural machinery.

The Candidate

Candidates will embody our Club values; excellence, prudence, integrity, courtesy. Previous grounds or turf experience advantageous. Advantageous qualifications – NVQ 2 in Greenkeeping / Sports Turf Management and PA1 and PA6 Spraying qualifications. Candidates will have a hands-on approach, the ability to work under pressure, have excellent attention to detail and will be friendly, polite and diplomatic.

Benefits

Our benefits include 23 days’ holidays (rising to 28 days after 5 years’ continuous service) plus Bank Holidays, life assurance, Group Income Protection, meals on duty, uniform, onsite parking, an annual bonus scheme and an annual performance pay review, along other benefits.

The Hurlingham Club is passionate about creating an inclusive workplace that promotes and values diversity.

Please note that, due to the high volume of applications we receive, if you do not hear from us within four weeks then unfortunately you were not successful in your application on this occasion.

Pitmen mourn loss of groundsman

Pitmen mourn loss of groundsman: Hednesford Town have paid tribute following the death of their head groundsman Dave Bates.

Read the full article from Express and Star here

Pitmen mourn loss of groundsman

Pitmen mourn loss of groundsman

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Genuinely maximise productivity with Kawasaki

Genuinely maximise productivity with Kawasaki

Genuinely maximise productivity with Kawasaki: Spring signals the start of the busiest period for your machines and Kawasaki has some top tips for minimising downtime and maximising productivity.

Coming out of winter storage and into the growing season, your machines will need to be functioning to their full capabilities. Martin Cook, Parts and Technical Manager at Kawasaki Engines, highlights key maintenance tasks to make sure your engine and machines perform at their absolute best this season.

Genuinely maximise productivity with Kawasaki

Having a mower Powered by Kawasaki will get you through the Spring growing season with minimal downtime and maximum productivity. Seen here is the FS730V.

First and foremost, remove the spark plugs and check the gap. Oil on a spark plug could be a sign of low compression. Don’t be tempted to clean the carbon deposits off the spark plugs, this can cause more problems than it’s worth for the price of a new spark plug. It is very important to get this right as misfiring or poor performing plugs can put stress on the engine.

The importance of performing overall checks on your machines cannot be underestimated and some have to be done more frequently than others. Engine oil level, loose or lost nuts and screws, fuel and oil leakage, battery electrolyte level and checking for a clear air intake screen are best done daily. Make sure you clean the air cleaner foam element every 25 hours and the spark plugs and air cleaner paper element every 100 hours or in preparation for Spring, whichever comes first.

While most of the checking and cleaning can be done by a workshop technician or competent landscaper, greenkeeper or groundsperson, there are some checks best performed by an authorised Kawasaki Engines Dealer. For example, changing engine oil and filter, cleaning the cylinder head fins and checking and adjusting the valve clearance.

If you didn’t drain the tank before storing the machine for winter, you are going to need to check the tank is clear of any water or debris. Ethanol attracts water and the engine could misfire if there is water in it. This should be easy enough to do as most engines have plastic, see-through tanks and the water will be sitting at the bottom. If in doubt, drain and refill.

Most ride-on mowers will have two oil reservoirs, one for hydrostatic oil and one for engine oil. Always check you are using the correct one when topping up. Some hydrostatic drives use the same oil as the engine. For those please check your machine’s operating manual.

One of the most important things you can do for the overall performance of your machine is to make sure the blades are sharp and balanced. All other aspects of the mower’s maintenance can be perfect, but if the blades are dull your engine has to work that much harder to deliver, and that has repercussions on the longevity of the engine’s life and fuel economy, as well as leading to recutting, affecting productivity.

One easy way to maintain your Kawasaki Engine’s reliability is by using only Kawasaki Genuine Parts. This can make all the difference between a reliable machine and one that is not. Using non-genuine parts means your machine is less likely to operate as productively or efficiently as it should. When you choose Kawasaki Genuine Parts you are assured of quality, reliability and compliance with original equipment specifications.

Most oil filters look the same on the outside, but inside a Kawasaki filter, a slotted alloy tube protects oil flow. A pressure-activate bypass valve prevents cold-start wear and maintains flow in case of blockages. Silicone valves, rubber seals and a heavy canister stand up to high temperatures and severe use. Kawasaki build provides a different level of engine protection, one you can count on.

Similarly, with Kawasaki air and oil filters, these are specifically designed with permeability that matches flow rates, operating pressures and temperatures of your Kawasaki engine – and most importantly, they fit exactly.

With machines heading into their busiest period, make sure you’re preparing them for peak performance. Time spent on routine preventative measures now, will mean any downtime is kept to a minimum and productivity at a maximum.

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Paul Cricket Club’s long serving groundsman

Paul Cricket Club’s long serving groundsman: Unsung hero, Steve Snell, has kept Paul Cricket Club’s pitch in top condition for nearly 60 years and has no plans of stopping any time soon.

Read the full article from The Falmouth Packet here

Paul Cricket Club's long serving groundsman

Paul Cricket Club’s long serving groundsman

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The life of a Dundee groundsman

The life of a Dundee groundsman: It’s no walk in the park being a groundsman at a Scottish football club when the dark winter hits.

Read the full article from The Courier here

The life of a Dundee groundsman

The life of a Dundee groundsman

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Groundsman sleeps out on pitch

Groundsman sleeps out on pitch: Chorley’s groundsman Ben Kay worked hard to make his team’s pitch playable, sleeping on the pitch under a heated tent.

Read the full article from The Daily Mail here

Groundsman sleeps out on pitch

Groundsman sleeps out on pitch

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FC Lorient groundsman dies

FC Lorient groundsman dies: A man working as a groundsman for Ligue 1 side FC Lorient has reportedly died after a floodlight bar on the stadium fell on him in a freak accident.

Read the full article from The Daily Mail here

FC Lorient groundsman dies

FC Lorient groundsman dies

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Sheep take over groundsman duties

Sheep take over groundsman duties: Although it’s hard to find many silver linings in the heavy clouds pressing down on us at the moment, one positive part of lockdown is the natural world taking back what’s been nabbed by humanity.

Whether it’s herds of wild goats taking over Llandudno, or deer roaming the estates of East London. Now, an enterprising decision to get sheep cutting the grass at a Welsh rugby club is the latest in animal-based good news that should brighten up your day, at least a little.

Sheep take over groundsman duties

Sheep take over groundsman duties

The BBC reports that the flock of sheep in question have been moved onto a Welsh rugby pitch during the lockdown. Brecon Rugby Club decided that, while sports fixtures are on hold during the coronavirus crisis, it would be a great idea to rent their pitch to the club’s chairman Paul Amphlett. Amphlett is also a shepherd and has a flock of sheep who need ground for grazing. So not only will Amphlett paying to rent the pitch serve to drum up some well needed dosh during the club’s fallow period, it also helps save on the maintenance fees for the pitch. He told the BBC” “the club needed to find a way to make and save some money during lockdown, I said I’d pay rent if they let me graze my sheep on the pitch.” He continued: “this in turn allowed us to keep our 73-year-old groundsman safely tucked away and also saved us some money on fertiliser.”

But how’re they actually doing on the job? The club’s coach Andy Powell said, “the sheep are doing a good job, the grass is nice and green and healthy.”

Amphlett, who’s come out of retirement as a paramedic to work on the frontline during the coronavirus crisis, is relieved to have his beasts cared for while he’s on duty. He told the BBC, “they need to be looked after because if they roll onto their backs they often can’t get back up.” I mean in fairness to the sheep, that’s inclined to happen to any of us at the best of times.

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Foxes keep groundsman busy

Foxes keep groundsman busy: A brush with the local fox population is keeping Leeds Rhinos’ groundsman Ryan Golding busy during the coronavirus crisis.

Most of Rhinos’ 150 employees have been placed on furlough, a form of paid leave, but Golding is among a handful still working – and vulpine pitch invaders are giving him plenty to do.

Foxes keep groundsman busy

Foxes keep groundsman busy

“They are a nightmare,” Golding said of the four-legged hooligans.

“They live near the railway track, in all the bushes there.

“On a night, when they are scavenging for food, they come into the stadium and they always dig in the same place on the pitch.

“They are digging bones into the pitch – I am finding bones all the time.”

The urban foxes are sometimes spotted on the terraces after games, which is one reason why cleaning crews are brought in so quickly following the final whistle.

Golding hopes fencing will deter the pests and noted: “It’s a unique problem, with it being an inner-city stadium.

“You

wouldn’t have a problem like that on an industrial site, it’s just another thing we have to deal with.”

On the other hand, the foxes do keep Emerald Headingley’s pigeons – another traditional groundsman’s enemy – at bay.

“They are stalking around the pitch on a night, waiting for the pigeons to land,” Golding reported.

“There are feathers everywhere! On a morning I have to go around picking pigeon carcasses up.

“It is like a war zone, but they don’t go near our feed, fertilizers or chemicals, which is good.”

Even without the foxes, Golding has his hands full restoring the pitch to its usual glory following unprecedented rainfall last winter.

“My assistants have been furloughed, so it’s just me,” he said.

“I am having to look after all the stadium and all of Kirkstall [Rhinos’ training base] on my own.

“It is challenging, but it’s quite enjoyable – it is taking me back to when I was younger, getting my hands dirty.

“It is very negative circumstances, but it is what it is – there’s people dying, so you can’t really moan.”

The last few months have been tough for Rhinos’ ground crew who, as well as looking after Headingley, had to cope with flooding at Kirkstall.

Golding recalled: “We had a record three months of rainfall – around 300-350 millimetres.

“That is a hell of a lot – and it wasn’t necessarily the weather, it was the timing.

“We always seemed to get downpours the night before games and the morning of.

“We weren’t really getting any luck and the game where it turned was the double-header [when Headingley staged Rhinos’ Betfred Super League opener against Hull immediately after Castleford Tigers had faced Toronto Wolfpack].

“We had a lot more rain than expected after the first game.

“I had two choices, to leave it as it is and have a slow surface, or take it on the chin and make it a fast one.”

Rhinos scored 154 points in their three home games after the loss to Hull and Golding added: “People say it looks like a beach, but it plays really well.

“That’s something I had to discuss with the management team, Rich [Agar, Rhinos’ coach] and Kev [Sinfield, director of rugby].

“I am not bothered what people say if it allows us to play fast rugby and get two points.

“That’s what we did, we applied sand quite regularly to make a fast, stable surface to enable the players to gain purchase – rather than it turning into a mudbath.”

The break has allowed Golding time to work on the pitch, but – with no clear indication when rugby will resume – he explained: “I don’t want to throw everything into recovery yet.

“It’s a bit like a finely-tuned athlete, you don’t want to hand it all the supplements and everything it requires now because it’s going to keep needing that.

“It is a sand-based surface so it drains very quickly and leaches nutrients very quickly, so I have to be careful with what I am applying.”

Life won’t get any less hectic for Golding – and his team – when the season eventually resumes.

Midweek matches are likely as Super League clubs race to make up for lost time, but Golding has no concerns over having to prepare the ground for multiple games in a short space of time.

He stressed: “I don’t see it as a bad thing.

“You get some groundsmen who are very much ‘keep off the pitch’, but I wouldn’t have a job if it wasn’t for the sport so let’s get as many games on as we can and get back to enjoying sport.”

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Tribute to groundsman Reg Lomas

Tribute to groundsman Reg Lomas: Reg Lomas, former head groundsman at Stratford and Cheltenham racecourses, has died at the age of 88.

Lomas was awarded an MBE in 2002 for his work within racing and had a race run at Ludlow in his honour in October 2005, the Reg Lomas Lifetime In Racing Handicap Chase.

Tribute to groundsman Reg Lomas

Tribute to groundsman Reg Lomas

“He was a great friend of mine and I worked with him for many years,” said Philip Arkwright, former clerk of the course at Cheltenham.

“I grabbed him when he retired from Stratford, having been there for a long time, and he came to Cheltenham until I retired in 2000. He was a remarkable groundsman.”

After leaving the racecourse, Arkwright nominated Lomas for an MBE to show his appreciation and paid tribute to his practical ability.

He said: “I put him up for an MBE shortly after I retired on account of his groundwork, and he was awarded it in 2002.

“He was very knowledgeable and that wasn’t born out of scientific knowledge, but of practical years looking at turf and dealing with different types of it.

“He was a groundsman even when I was hunter-chasing back in the mid-1960s, so he did it for a good 50 years. He was bloody good at his job.”

Lomas, who is survived by wife Elizabeth, retired in June 2001 at the age of 69, but remained an active participant in the sport alongside trainer Jonjo O’Neill.

“When Reg retired Jonjo made quite a lot of use of him,” said Arkwright. “He knew him very well and used his brain a lot. They were huge mates and lived within half a mile of each other.”

Arkwright added: “From the moment I retired in 2000 we spoke on nearly every Saturday. He was a delightful man.”

Click here to read the original article

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